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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There has been a lot of discussion on the use of the Red Cross to stop a stage. Some feel we should have different methods to stop the stage (stop signs, flags, etc) depending on the emergency, or the incident. My question is why?
There is one function of the Red Cross, to stop the following cars. Why should it matter what they are stopping for? The important thing is that they stop. They then need to assess the situation, gather information and bring that information to the next Radio point. The Radio Operator then passes the information on to Net Control and the proper response is set in motion, Medical, Fire, Police, Spectator Control.
Keep it simple, there should be only one method to stop the stage.
 

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If we only have one way to stop the stage, under the current rules the stage has to be scrubbed for the following competitors.

Having the opportunity to stop a stage, resolve a problem in a timely manner, and re-start a stage would be good for some instances.

So a red-cross can be the stage stop tool, but the rules might need re-thinking.


I actually like a red-cross for emergency situations only. The clarity of "send in the Emergency Response Team" is important. A stage can be stopped for many reasons, so an alternative to the red-cross and its required actions could be helpful.

Mike
 

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>There is one function of the Red Cross, to stop the
>following cars. Why should it matter what they are stopping
>for?

You're probably also comfortable that the SCCA does NOT require emergency first aid training for drivers and co-drivers ... (on this note do SCCA Sup Regs indicate the state's Good Samaratin Laws in the event that a competitor is compelled to provide first aid?)

The Red Cross means that the crew needs EMERGENCY Medical Help (OK - it means they feel they need emergency medical help) so the one function of the red cross is NOT to stop following cars, it is to indicate serious injury which in turn requires the stage to be stopped.
 

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A group of us suggested requiring CPR & First Aid training as a condition of licensing. We were told that SCCA's lawyers nixed it on the grounds that requiring it placed SCCA at fault if any licensed driver did the wrong thing. The year was 1981.
 
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I alluded to this before, but it was perhaps overlooked in the melee.

Wouldn't there be value in strongly suggesting that the cars are equipped with Ham radios?

The time delay from having to relay the information to the radio op at finish control is significantly reduced.

Licensing issues are trivial. The added value of the radios for other purposes would make it an easier pill to swallow.


Is this practical?
 

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Licensing issues may in fact be trivial but will not be perceived as such. A fair degree of preparation is required for the exam. Based upon the enthusiastic response to the idea of mandatory first aid courses (much, much easier and more available), I predict a mandatory ham license is a non-starter.
 

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>Licensing issues may in fact be trivial but will not be
>perceived as such. A fair degree of preparation is required
>for the exam. Based upon the enthusiastic response to the
>idea of mandatory first aid courses (much, much easier and
>more available), I predict a mandatory ham license is a
>non-starter.

Two issues: actually earning the license, as well as the cost of the equipment in the car. I have to agree with Paul--good idea but not something you can force on the competitor.

[hr]

[p align=right]John Dillon
John @ WidgetRacing.com
www.WidgetRacing.com
 
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I guess I'm interested in exploring the operational changes that could occur with a greater abundance of communication.

I'm in agreement that it would be difficult to mandate radios.

If the general direction is to allow competitors to stop stages to increase safety, the additional time required to relay the message from the course to finish control can really only be viewed as a detriment.

I'm not totally familar with current operational procedures for "behind the scenes" type things. I'm looking at it strictly from the standpoint that the current trend seems to be to allow marshalls and/or competitors the power to make very high level decisions while having no timely ability to communicate with the outside.

Maybe it's completely a non-issue.

The addition of the code free tech license is somewhat new.

As for the liability issues surrounding first aid, even this has changed somewhat since the 1980s with the passing of Good Samaritan laws in some states.


I've driven a tow truck since I was 14. They are equipped with a handful of different signalling lights. The correct choice of lights conveys the appropriate message to other traffic.

A universal sign, say a red cross, doesn't allow different information to be conveyed. It only says "stop".

Is that adequate? Can the rest of information be carried verbally?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My thought was, why not keep it simple? Why have multiple ways to stop the following cars, when the important thing is to stop the following cars. The only ones seeing the Red Cross are the following cars. You don't need to know it is a Medical Emergency as you pull up to the car. You will find that out when you stop. Those on site then decide on the best course of action. If those in the first car know first aid they would start to help. If the second car is an emergency room doctor, the first car would then proceed to the next Radio point and pass on the infromation to the Radio Net.
You could require Radios in all cars but because of the terrain there are many spots on the stage that can not reach the Radio Net. Cell Phone coverage is even worse. Let's not start on the different ways Radio Nets are used across the series. Some events have one frequency through a directed Net Control for the entire event. Some need to use two or three frequencis because of tower limitations. Some events have the Stage Captain run each stage independently with a different frequency. You would need to know what frequency is best to use for the location you are at. You would also need to how to actually use the Radio and change to that frequency. I only use my Radio at Rallys and I always need to re-learn every event. Although Radios in cars sounds like a good solution, it would be hard to have effective implementation.
 
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