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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I am not sure where this belongs, but here it goes.

I am presently finishing off building my commuter/winter bicycle, and am looking for a decent tire for winter use. Sadly, studded tires are heavy and have little to no traction on pavement. Any other tire is crappy on ice. Further, there isn't much in the way of different tread compounds, except silica tread.

I was wondering how tractionizing is done, to see if I can tractionize a set of bike tires to try in the winter proper.

As I understand it, the tire is spun agains a drum covered in little metal hooks (a la velcro) which rip up the top of the treadblocks. If anyone can provide more detail, that would be great!!

Cheers

Dean
 

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what kind of bicycles ? and what do you want to do ?

bicycles courier in Ottawa and MTL use thin road tires...it cut true the snow... wen racing winter biker cross i used to put srew in the tires...like moto ice racer....but...like you sead it not to good on tarmac...

On most of the event i did on snow ....like ski hill...i just used very narow tires...

yes ...its not very good on ice...but its easy to get used to it...





Alain Lavoie
24Rallyteam
http://www.abikeonline.com/24rallyteam/
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Basically, it's on an old, converted mtb that is now a singlespeed, so no gears to help traction. As a result, I am thinking that a tire with somewhat widely spaced treadblocks, if tractionized will be better on tarmac than studs, won't be as heavy as studs, should drain better in the snow than a close block pattern and have good ice traction if tractionized.

I have a few sets of tires I can mess around with, and if I ruin them, it's ok...

I most of the time will be in dry or icy conditions, so I figure a larger tire with wide contact patch would be best, but you guys tell me, after all, here's a group who knows all about tires in bad conditions...

I just figured the tractionizing principle could be applied to mtb tires.

Dean
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I appreciate the advice on various models of bike tires, but that is not what I am asking about. In fact, I work at a bike shop so I can get almost any tire.

On a lark, i would like to try to TRACTIONIZE the tires, to see what the results are. If you know how this process works, please post a response.

Thank you.
 

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straight at T
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>I appreciate the advice on various models of bike tires, but
>that is not what I am asking about. In fact, I work at a
>bike shop so I can get almost any tire.
>
>On a lark, i would like to try to TRACTIONIZE the tires, to
>see what the results are. If you know how this process
>works, please post a response.

You had the basics. Run the tire against a spiked drum (just straight spikes on the ones I've seen) so that the tread blocks get lots of little punctures and end up looking like sponges. You'd probably have to experiment with the drum diameter/spike length to get decent results without destroying the tire. Whether the result will help - thats what experimentation is for... ;-)

Adrian
 

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Basically you want to turn it into the fuzzy side of velcro with a roller that looks like a medieval torture device. The downside is that the blocks will be squirmy when traction is good and will wear quickly in the dry, but it sounds like a good idea for a bike.

Trust Canadians (my peeps) to 1. try to race cars on a frozen lake, 2. figure out how to chew up a normal tire to work better on the frozen lake, 3. ride bicycles in winter, 4. figure out how to apply frozen-lake-racing technology to winter bicycling.

ACP
Flirting with the laws of physics.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
thanks for the advice guys. I'll be sure to let you know how things work out. I think I'll try to find something like a grinding brush for a power drill at a hardware store, rather than trying to make my own mechanism...
 

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Dean... some of the new "sticky" rubber compounds are surprisingly good on ice, especially if you cut down the knobs. Because the rubber is so soft and malleable, even shortened knobs will flex to grip. Maxxis 40 compound tires are good because they don't seem to get hard in the cold. Now, what about cutting down the knobs AND cutting sipes into them??? Hmmm....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Defenitely something to think about, but first I am going to explore with what I've got. I presently have two sets of Bontragers and an IRC front and Spec rear which will go under the "knife" first. If they all end up useless I will look into other options. Nokian also makes a few tires the right size that I've heard are pretty good. I think one is even called a Hakkapeliita (sp?) Maybe order a set of those!
 

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You're correct about the Nokian Hakka's, you can get studded tires for your bike from the folks that make some of the best winter tires for your car!

Here's a few more studded bike tire options:

Schwalbe Ice Spiker 26 x 2.10
http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_...11&PRODUCT<>prd_id=660327&bmUID=1068528743654

Schwalbe Snow Stud 26 x 1.9
http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_...11&PRODUCT<>prd_id=483885&bmUID=1068528743656

Schwalbe Snow Stud 700 x 38C
http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_...11&PRODUCT<>prd_id=483889&bmUID=1068528743658

...all from my favourite outdoor shop ;)

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Bill, thanks for the tip. I had seen those tires but amconsidering them as a last resort. Here's why.

1. they are 59.00 each, I am a student.

2. I'd like to try something that hasn't normally been done.

3. Studded tires are ok if ice and snow are all you ride on, but this will be for a commuter bike which will see at least 50% pavement. Studs and pavement don't mix. I've ridden studded tires before and when on pavement have a total lack of faith in the level of traction.

However, like I said, if nothing else works out, and I have money making a hole burn in my pocket, I'll be sure to give it a try.
 
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