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www.p-sport.com

These have just been posted:

examples of both types of notes, a glossary, a visual description of turns, and a survey for competitors to complete.

If you are having any problems opening these files, or need them in a different format, please e-mail me at [email protected] and I'll take care of your request...

Bill
 

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So, a few things that don't seem clear to me:

1. What's the significance of the long arrow under one of the notes?

2. What's the rightmost column (15, 16, 17) for? Why do numbers only appear every other line?

3. What's the meaning of the "6.05" placed below the first note with a line on both sides?

Anyone know if notes will be used at Ojibwe?
 

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>1. What's the significance of the long arrow under one of
>the notes?

Underlining means that everything should be read as one instruction. Basically it is a very fast transfer to the next instruction and you need to read as one as there is little to no break between them.

>2. What's the rightmost column (15, 16, 17) for? Why do
>numbers only appear every other line?

These are corresponding route book instruction. In the West they also place markers arrows on the course so that people know that these instructions match up. Very nice stuff, but Ojibwe will not have that luxury.

>3. What's the meaning of the "6.05" placed below the first
>note with a line on both sides?

Distance from the start and is a route book as an instruction located at 6.05.

So if a Marshall tells you that the stage will now end at Mileage 6.05 instruction 17, you know where that is in the Notes with out trying to find the matching instruction and transferring it over from the route book.

>Anyone know if notes will be used at Ojibwe?

Yes they will be available. But regular route books will also be available. If you run with the Notes, make sure to have the route book with you just incase it isn't working for you.

JB Niday has my copy of the Oregon Trail event (in numeric) if you would like to look them over some afternoon.
 

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It's not clear to me where the underline begins and ends.

Why do some of the underlines end in a big arrow and some don't? Does the arrow mean that this underline is meant to continue to the next line?
 

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Hey thanks for all the great info! I was looking all over for a glossary that described the US notes thanks! But how come there no word that describes something between into and 50? Doesnt that get confusing to the driver? Isnt there supposed to be a into, and, and then? :)
 

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>It's not clear to me where the underline begins and ends.
>
>Why do some of the underlines end in a big arrow and some
>don't? Does the arrow mean that this underline is meant to
>continue to the next line?

Exactly, just keep reading untill you come to a break in the line.

As for the following notes and distances. There was "into", a space between notes which ment somewhere less than 40 yards, and "50" which meant a distance between 40 and 60 yards. Above that they tried to give the distance.

Dave
[email protected]
 

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Help an old dog understand ...

You'll soon understand why I'm a driver ...

First - Am I correct believing there are 176 yards in a tenth of a mile?

Second - Are folks who use these notes calibrating their odos for yards? Or is the navvie supposed to calculate that stuff in his/her head on the fly? This is one old dog who is keen to learn a new trick, but it's tough since the old system has been hammered into my being since the 70s!

Halley ...
http://www.realautosport.com
 

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RE: Help an old dog understand ...

>You'll soon understand why I'm a driver ...
>
>First - Am I correct believing there are 176 yards in a
>tenth of a mile?
>
>Second - Are folks who use these notes calibrating their
>odos for yards? Or is the navvie supposed to calculate that
>stuff in his/her head on the fly? This is one old dog who
>is keen to learn a new trick, but it's tough since the old
>system has been hammered into my being since the 70s!
>
>Halley ...
>http://www.realautosport.com

Mike, I did not look at the odo on stage with the stage notes, there are no incremental mileages in the stage notes, only overall. In the NW we are spoilt by all the instructions in the route book being marked and numbered by the side of the road, so it was easy to find you place in the book when I got lost.

It is a steep learning curve for both people in the car.

Dave
[email protected]
 

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RE: Help an old dog understand ...

Dave said:
>It is a steep learning curve for both people in the car.

This is a little of what concerns me. I'm fairly certain the StudBug will be at STPR thanks to contributions by career navvie #15, but that plugs a variable into the equation right off. Since winning the class is my only agenda for events I manage to enter this year, I'm wrestling with limiting the number of variables and lose the apparent speed advantage of running notes or risk a DNF thanks to possible miscommunication.

Plus - anyone care to guess what the true 'notes advantage' will be in dusty or foggy conditions?

Halley ...
http://www.realautosport.com
 

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RE: Help an old dog understand ...

> Mike said - Plus - anyone care to guess what the true 'notes advantage' will be in dusty or foggy conditions?

The answer to that is how much would you trust the notes and the person reading them?

My first experience with stage notes was at Oregon Trail this year, the driver had never used any form of notes before and it had been 6 years since I had.

I spoke to a number of co-drivers both during and after the event, they were all new to notes and all had a couple of particular problems-

1) The workload ? co-drivers are busy, I was glancing out the windows to pick up corners and reference them to the book as we
approached them to ensure I was in the right place. Other than that I was in the book.

2) Keeping track of where they were ? getting lost in either a series of corners, or just getting the pace you are reading to the driver
wrong.

It is a really steep learning curve for the co-driver; a lot of people underestimated that.

Drivers had issues of trying to make sense of the information they were being given. If a driver is used to one or two instructions a mile then
the continuous stream of numbers or descriptions is too much information for some.

I ended up not giving out the + and -, then dropping the ?fast? or ?1? (he can see round those) unless there was a crest noted. So I was just
telling the driver the bigger corners, straights and crests.

Getting lost is not such a problem in the North West events; the route book is more comprehensive than most and every instruction is
marked in the route book, in the stage notes and on the side of the road with a numbered arrow.

So when you get lost it is just a matter of telling the driver ?drive what you see? and looking for the next arrow. Then you are in the right place
in the notes. Events outside the NW are not as good (or have as comprehensive route books, Oregon is especially good) at putting the
arrows out, let alone numbering them, so that adds another problem.
 

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RE: Help an old dog understand ...

My experience at Oregon Trail was very similar to what Dave Kean described. I think our team adapted quite readily to the new format, perhaps better than most teams; it did take a concerted effort on both the part of driver and co-driver.

I, too, was very busy, what with stopwatches, route book for transits, stage notes (2 books per day), timecards, video camera, resetting the TT303, etc. This was a first time for stage notes for both driver and myself, and, yes, the learning curve was stee-eep! I had to constantly read the road to both keep my place in the book and gauge my cadence for giving instructions to my driver. We used the descriptive format, which took a little getting used to. (I'm used to differentiating between an "acute" and a "hairpin", whereas they referred to all corners tighter than 90 degrees as "bad." "Bad turn, BAD!") We might try the numbered format next time.

I get get lost a few times, and had to use the referenced mileage or next route book instruction to get me back on track. I also had a couple of instructions sneak up on me, leaving little time for a clear call. But once we got the hang of it all, we had some stages that were sweet! Due in good part to the precise nature of the notes, and finding a rhythm that just clicked for us. For each instruction between "into" and "50" I tried to insert an "and" to indicate this medium quick transition.

At the conclusion of the event, when it dawned on my driver and me that notes would NOT be available at our next event, we found ourselves a bit depressed at having to go back to the "old" standard route book. We look forward to our next opportunity to run notes. Notes are our friend!

Kathryn Hansen
Co-Driver
#286 Dodge Colt
 

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RE: Help an old dog understand ...

Charlie said: ...or 1.701 X 10(-14) light years...

But Charlie,

I think that maximum terminal velocity on the StudBug is only 1.2 X 10(-14)light years per hour... :p

Kent Gardam
 

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RE: Help an old dog understand ...

>Charlie said: ...or 1.701 X 10(-14) light years...
>
>But Charlie,
>
>I think that maximum terminal velocity on the StudBug is
>only 1.2 X 10(-14)light years per hour... :p
>
>Kent Gardam

You forgot the added speed vectors of the solar wind and the previous night's dinner at Taco Bell... :7
 
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