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Can't we go any faster?
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I've attached a link to an article that details the remote service area from Rally Finland this year. It's interesting to see how even an event as big as Finland was able to utilize a very tidy remote service to open up additional stage roads and increase visibility to spectators who might not have made the drive to the main service / stage area.

I'm sure some will meet this with negativity and say it's not possible at their event, but if you're loosing roads or want to expand roads and visibility for your competitors and sponsors, I can see this kind of thing helping events. I thought it to be a good insight to a large scale events operations. Would like to see how well anyone in the US could implement this.

My fancy link
 

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sataviisiky
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I agree with Adam, a simple remote service can open up areas of the Rally that would be impossible to cover otherwise, as the distance would be too far from the main service park or general main area of the rally.
Also, a simple remote regroup is used by WRC organizers to have the cars stop in a town or village where an high concentration of spectators is expected or wanted. It may be a town that is sponsoring the event that gets to have the remote service or regroup, so businesses in that town receive increased income or exposure by the spectators attending.
In Germany the remote regroup on leg 2 was held at the Bilstein factory, which is a sponsor of the Rally.

Other examples in Sweden and France this year, where remote regroups and services were held.
You'll be amazed the attendance of spectators by the thousands at remote services or regroups, as it's an opportunity to see the drivers and cars very closely.

The main important thing with the remote service tho is that needs to be short (15 minutes) and in the middle of the leg.
By doing that you force the teams to take limited vehicles, spares (in WRC is controlled by a specific rule for remote services too), personnel, etc. which doesn't increase the costs and logistic movements by much.
 

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NASA Rally Sport grassroots!!!
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Interesting, the only thing (to go on the cars) allowed to be brought in by the service crew is four spare tires, and hand tools only. Everything else has to be in the rally car. No fueling, in contrast to most of the 'remote services' seen in the US.

Anders
 

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Dramamine is for DramaQueens
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No fueling, in contrast to most of the 'remote services' seen in the US.
But if you look at WRC event schedules you'll also see that there a number of remote fuel stops as well. In the case of Finland, two remote fuels before and two after the remote service. (and 134 km of stage distance with ONLY the remote service and remote fuels)

Sweden was 131 km between full services, (one remote service and 4 remote fuel)

I can't help but think of the many teams we see at events who are poorly equipped for remote servicing. (either no service crew or tow rigs that are inappropriate for remote servicing.) Make remote fueling AND remote servicing a part of the package and you start weeding out the low budget teams.

I think any implementation of this in Canada or the United States sh/would include the fueling at the remote service as well as a parts/fuel ferrying service arranged by the event organizer.
 

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Idaho handled Remote fueling by saying to put your gas cans in this trailer by X:30 in the morning.

We could dumb it down pretty easily by just saying 1 service vehicle per team, no trailers. (for remote services)

The no service crew does seem to happen fairly often recently. always always seems to be about 20% of the teams needing someone to drive their rig..

hmm...
 

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Dramamine is for DramaQueens
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Idaho handled Remote fueling by saying to put your gas cans in this trailer by X:30 in the morning.
Hauling fuel has a bunch of restrictions that would make that both interesting and challenging in many jurisdictions. (Oddly, I think you can carry more fuel in plastic jugs than you can in sealed drums.)
 

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The idea has its merits, but its downsides as well. While there are opportunities to open up new areas and get more remote areas involved, the extra traffic in those areas (as well as the routes to and fro) can create other problems. Even 50-60 extra vehicles in some remote areas can cause negative feedback from the neighbors. It's not always a simple issue.

Centralized service areas are a relatively new thing. Service crews used to visit several places during a rally, including some ugly roadside spots. One year at POR, we started in Houghton and serviced in Marquette and Munising, among other places, putting hundreds of miles on the service vehicle (and crew) in one night.

Bruce
 

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just another old phart
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One year at POR, we started in Houghton and serviced in Marquette and Munising, among other places, putting hundreds of miles on the service vehicle (and crew) in one night.

Bruce
Another old guy story, oft told, but when the POR route used to be three nights and 2000 miles in the early 70s, the service crews would put just about as many miles on their vehicles as did the rally cars.
 

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your other left, you idiot
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And sometimes drive faster..........

(Oh, wait, I can't say that)

Another old guy story, oft told, but when the POR route used to be three nights and 2000 miles in the early 70s, the service crews would put just about as many miles on their vehicles as did the rally cars.
press on,
 

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Old Fart
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Another old guy story, oft told, but when the POR route used to be three nights and 2000 miles in the early 70s, the service crews would put just about as many miles on their vehicles as did the rally cars.
And in the early/mid 70"s there were no designate service areas. You just found out where and when the cars would transit some state highway and set up service on the shoulder. At least Michigan state highways generally had wide shoulders.
 

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just another old phart
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And in the early/mid 70"s there were no designate service areas. You just found out where and when the cars would transit some state highway and set up service on the shoulder. At least Michigan state highways generally had wide shoulders.
Yup, and a distinctive sign or arrangement of lights or a pumpkin or something on the service vehicle was valuable in identifying your Suburban or old panel van or Chevy station wagon or whatever from all the other similar rusty service vehicles as the rally cars went by in the middle of the night in the rain at 50+ MPH. :)
 
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