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don't cut
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Or what ever symbol you want to use.

Situation: Car on fire (real big American flames not little bitty English ones <G>) Crew out and safe.

Action: Crew uses up their extinguishers. Flags down next team, gets their extinguishers. 2nd team gives over extinguisher proceeds to stage end and reports fire requiring assistance. Radio net notifies control who stops stage start and dispatches fire truck. All teams receive the time of the last car to complete the stage.

Any difference between this and using Red Cross symbol because of an injury accident? Only difference I see is the fire truck was dispatched instead of an ambulance. The symbol used does not change the actions taken.
 

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I'd call that a "Red Cross" situation, just like the FCC would say that it would be appropriate to call "Mayday" on the radio in that situation.

But that's just me.

JBLewis
 

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>Or what ever symbol you want to use.
>
>Situation: Car on fire (real big American flames not little
>bitty English ones <G>) Crew out and safe.
>
>Action: Crew uses up their extinguishers. Flags down next
>team, gets their extinguishers. 2nd team gives over
>extinguisher proceeds to stage end and reports fire
>requiring assistance. Radio net notifies control who stops
>stage start and dispatches fire truck. All teams receive the
>time of the last car to complete the stage.
>
>Any difference between this and using Red Cross symbol
>because of an injury accident? Only difference I see is the
>fire truck was dispatched instead of an ambulance. The
>symbol used does not change the actions taken.

I have legitimate experience coming up on a car that is actively burning to the ground. Flames at least 30 feet in the air. Wild West 1998 a turbo saab caught on fire and was fully engulfed when we got there. We couldn't pass the car, and we couldn't go back down the stage.

We ended up showing the red cross to the next couple of cars because there wasn't a way to get our cars out of the way and we didn't know of anyway else to get them to stop. Perhaps a full red page at the back of the book in addition to the red cross?

Organisers figured out they were missing enough cars and stopped the stage.

Fire extinguishers did about as much good as peeing on a forest fire.
 

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Yep, something about an electric pump actively fueling the fire until the pump itself melted down will a thing like that...

JBLewis
 

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I would agree that with the description of the situation given at the start of this post this would be a "RED CROSS" situation for safety/medical teams to respond to. If the car continues to burn after all those little fire extinguishers are used - Yes, a fire truck would probably be dispatched to aid the current safety/medical teams for back up. I know what "we" currently carry in our rescue trucks for fire suppression - but arrival time is a factor in above scenerio.

I would really like to see an advocation for use of "Cold Fire" for onboard fire suppression versus the current chem extinguishers. Have you heard of it? It is really some remarkable stuff.. mixed with water and carried in extinguishers or tanks.

At a training session - I watched as a fellow rescue person put out a fire to his satisfaction with a chem extinguisher and announced to the instructor that the fire was "out". Only to have the instructor pass a flame torch over the area with one fast sweep and reignite the fire. Same fire soaked with mixture of water and "Cold Fire" - absolutely out!

Just a thought to the stated effectivness of the extingisher in said scenrio by Trevor... Trust me - when I am in the "woods" I would prefer to carry "Cold Fire" anyday... and it is available to the public in a can form or in a 5 gallon pail container which is to be mixed in proportion with water ... It is the company's preferred application... called "Cold Fire"- available online at firefreeze.com. This product was originally formulated to be used as a hand sanatizer - go figure!

NHRA and NASCAR are currently using this product at their race events with their fire suppresion/ rescue teams. Most of the rescue trucks used at Headwaters/ Ojibwe events (or LSPR where we help) from the group known as RED LIGHT RESCUE are carrying chem and "Cold Fire". Any one wanting more "personal" first hand usage information please feel free to contact me, or visit the the website redlightrescue.com and send an email requesting more information.

And No ... I do not work for them ....just know a great product when I see it ....

Rally Angel
 

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don't cut
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Having watched the recent pit fires in F1 and IRL, it appears they also use a product similar to this Pete Morris seems to be selling such a product also.

And as to the question of who first thought up the "silly" idea of using the red cross to stop a stage for other than a medical emergency, I was correct in that it was an actual competitor.
 

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>It is the company's preferred
>application... called "Cold Fire"- available online at
>firefreeze.com. This product was originally formulated to be
>used as a hand sanatizer - go figure!

Check it out at http://firefreeze.com/site/page1.cfm if ya want to avoid the 3 minute flash intro to the site. Who the heck thinks this is a good idea; I swear web masters should be forced to surf their site at 56K and hold their breath until the page loads.

Good thing my patience lasted, the product looks good.
 
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