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www.tommygunrally.com
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+1. I was telling a few off road BAJA racers about this clinic this weekend, since they use a very cumbersome (and inaccurate it seems) system based on GPS. I'll try to get their contact info to forward this thread to them.
 

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your other left, you idiot
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Eli-

Can we learn anything from them? I've found my Magellan to be pretty accurate for describing the road. Now, I realize you guys aren't always constained by the "road". Also, it's only as good as the signal (goes away with tree cover - another thing you don't have to deal with).

I used it one night to drive a foggy road when I could only see a couple of feet in front of me. (Doesn't work for squat for seeing deer).

+1. I was telling a few off road BAJA racers about this clinic this weekend, since they use a very cumbersome (and inaccurate it seems) system based on GPS. I'll try to get their contact info to forward this thread to them.
press on,
 

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150 K Right 4 Into Truck Dust
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Jimmy, you are so smart;) I like that, using the GPS in the fog, as I do too, I also use the GPS in Baja in total "dust out" I cant see the road off my hood, but the codriver is telling me strait, go strait:eek:

Did you guys notice we do not use our Terrable Trip 303+ (turned off), we use our Lowrance Baja 850 in the new truck.

I know what Jimmy is thinking, Better get that 303 fired up for the trees in Idaho:)

Bill Holmes
Truck #44
 

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What happened to "I drive what I see Bill'? Must be the addition of a 'real' co-driver.
By the way I have GPS in my 'Historic' 510. Will I be arrested???
Roger
 

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www.tommygunrally.com
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1,541 Posts
Eli-

Can we learn anything from them? I've found my Magellan to be pretty accurate for describing the road. Now, I realize you guys aren't always constained by the "road". Also, it's only as good as the signal (goes away with tree cover - another thing you don't have to deal with).

I used it one night to drive a foggy road when I could only see a couple of feet in front of me. (Doesn't work for squat for seeing deer).



press on,
From what I can tell, our recce/jemba seems to be the most efficient manner of doing notes.

If you can believe it, when these guys I was talking to pre-run, they mark waypoints on the GPS, write notes for each waypoint in a notebook, then go back at service/hotel and type in the notes into the GPS software, which is then uploaded to the in-car GPS device (with a nice 7" display). Then they read the notes as they approach the waypoints. Seems cumbersome for us, but essential for their racing where (i'm assuming) many of the roads they race on show up on GPS and also for when they are following other drivers through their dust.

Also, I think with some of the tighter stuff (like Powerline at Gorman), the resolution wouldn't be close enough or update fast enough to make it worthwhile....of course you dont necessarily need notes on powerline anyway, but I digress.

I'm sure Bill knows 100x more about this than me, but I'll tell you that not many rally drivers would like to foot the bill for a very expensive Lowrance GPS system, esp. when recce/notes/jemba seems to work just fine.
 

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From what I can tell, our recce/jemba seems to be the most efficient manner of doing notes.
For short stages with a very specific route, like rally, yes, for longer stages like desert racing (like Baja 1000), or marathon racing (like Dakar), I don't think so.

If you can believe it, when these guys I was talking to pre-run, they mark waypoints on the GPS, write notes for each waypoint in a notebook, then go back at service/hotel and type in the notes into the GPS software, which is then uploaded to the in-car GPS device (with a nice 7" display). Then they read the notes as they approach the waypoints. Seems cumbersome for us, but essential for their racing where (i'm assuming) many of the roads they race on show up on GPS and also for when they are following other drivers through their dust.
People like 'PCI Scott' do pre-runs of the course several weeks before the race, and you can buy pre-made maps of the course that you just load into your GPS, so you already have all the data, or at least a working base copy of the data that you can make adjustments to if you want. IIRC, the cost for the pre-made GPS maps is similar to the cost of the Jemba notes. Some of the bigger teams have nice big high-def 10" color GPS displays. Plus in their case, like Dakar, there is not necessarily a specific road they have to follow, they just need to go through all the waypoints. So if e.g. one competitor is stuck in a sandwash, they will take a parallel route to avoid getting stuck behind the other already stuck competitor. Like I said, I think their maps are more like connected waypoints rather than specific roads and corners.

Also, I think with some of the tighter stuff (like Powerline at Gorman), the resolution wouldn't be close enough or update fast enough to make it worthwhile....of course you dont necessarily need notes on powerline anyway, but I digress.
Yeah, but I'm also not sure that you'd want, every single bump, corner, distance etc. (a la Jemba notes) called for a non-stop 600 mile race either, just the significant waypoints, turns, and gotchas.

I'm sure Bill knows 100x more about this than me, but I'll tell you that not many rally drivers would like to foot the bill for a very expensive Lowrance GPS system, esp. when recce/notes/jemba seems to work just fine.
The GPS systems do cost somehwat more than a rally odo, but for many of the offroad teams a one-off extra $1000 isn't the end of the world. Plus they don't necessarily have the recurring cost for Jemba notes at every race, and if they do pay for pre-made GPS maps, IIRC, it's about the same cost as Jemba notes.
 
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