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Faster Mabricator
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From an earlier thread regarding a method to obtain the reason for retirement (DNF) for the results, the way to do it without relying on the team to inform scoring is for sweep to collect the timecards of teams who've broken or crashed and insure a reason is written on the timecard.

CARS collects all rallycar's logbooks at tech. inspection, holds the logbooks until competitors submit an event evaluation following the rally and at that time document any structural damage inflicted to the car or the overall finish result. This method provides for accurate recordkeeping of the car, most importantly what damage that has been recently repaired for the next event's tech inspector to closely inspect.

Not only does this procudure insure accurate record keeping of the car, but by requiring competitors to fill out an event evaluation (driver's rate and comment on facilities, organization, roads, stage lengths, control placement, marshalling, awards, supplementals,...) valuable information is gained on what aspects the competitors liked or disliked about the rally so that improvements can be made in future events to make them better.

US sanctioning bodies may want to look into following these procedures as although its somewhat a hassle by additional paperwork, it pays off with safer cars and better events in the longrun.
 

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Holding logbooks has been done in the US at various events, and I believe it's been considered for inclusion in the rules. Nothing PREVENTS an event from doing it.

I think it's a good idea. I've seen cars that were rolled come to a later event without any indication in the logbook...we need at least a heads-up to the tech chief that SOMETHING nasty happened.

To prevent lost/strayed logbooks, I suggested to one event organizer that they require an entrant to submit his logbook in a self-addressed, stamped envelope...first class, certified, Priority Mail - whatever his level of paranoia requires...just in case. Competitors that didn't finish and didn't pick up logbooks would have at least a DNF note in the book before being returned.

Bruce
 

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>To prevent lost/strayed logbooks, I suggested to one event
>organizer that they require an entrant to submit his logbook
>in a self-addressed, stamped envelope...first class,
>certified, Priority Mail - whatever his level of paranoia
>requires...just in case. Competitors that didn't finish and
>didn't pick up logbooks would have at least a DNF note in
>the book before being returned.


I think that's an important point. I know that the one time we DNFed at Maine, we pretty much packed up and drove home. Trying to find the right person to get our logbook returned would have been a nightmare.

I imagine that post event logbook return would always result in a few strays.

Of course the tech inspector/organizers would then have the burden of going through the results and annotating all the log books.
 

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straight at T
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>>To prevent lost/strayed logbooks, I suggested to one event
>>organizer that they require an entrant to submit his logbook
>>in a self-addressed, stamped envelope...first class,
>>certified, Priority Mail - whatever his level of paranoia
>>requires...just in case. Competitors that didn't finish and
>>didn't pick up logbooks would have at least a DNF note in
>>the book before being returned.
>
>
>I think that's an important point. I know that the one time
>we DNFed at Maine, we pretty much packed up and drove home.
>Trying to find the right person to get our logbook returned
>would have been a nightmare.
>
>I imagine that post event logbook return would always result
>in a few strays.
>
>Of course the tech inspector/organizers would then have the
>burden of going through the results and annotating all the
>log books.

In Canada, the event stewards (a concept alien to SCCA events) hold and annotate the logbooks and they and/or CARS arrange the return of any 'left over' logbooks.

Adrian
 

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>Holding logbooks has been done in the US at various events,
>and I believe it's been considered for inclusion in the
>rules.

Yes it has been done in the US, many times; no aliens here, Adrian! It was a much more common practice around 15 years ago, but the problems of teams going out on the last stage and not getting their cars out until well into Sunday AM presented some prety bad logistics of returning the logbooks; in a couple of cases, books were never seen again. We had to chase wround at STPR one year for about 3 hours to find our book; that lost time came out of our drive time home after finishing at 6 AM. For events like Tulip200 which often ended late on Saturday night, sometimes the tech guy was long gone come Sunday AM. And, we had to leave MFR pretty soon after impound this year to get back home early; with the impound issues, we would not have gotten our books back in time even with finishing.

I would like to see the notations, but as a techie, would feel terrible if anyone's logbook was lost. I would only like this if it was the onus of the techie to get the books back; that is what I wrote in my comments to SCCA. Let the organizers foot the reurn fee bill in the logistical problem cases.

Mark B.
 
G

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Maybe instead of keeping the actual logbook, the event would issue a half page Avery label to adhere into the book?

The competitor would be responsible for putting it into their book and at the next event, the tech guys would at least be able to wonder why they had a pre-event inspection with no post-event notations?

One of the aircraft mechanics where my dad/brother works uses a lot of self-adhesive labels to make routine entries into the logbooks for aircraft.

It prevents the logbooks from being subjected to whiteout, terrible handwriting and that sort of thing.

The entry could be authenticated with a stamped imprimt, like a notary stamp.

In practice, you would go through your pre-event tech as normal. The tech people would enter any damage information required on the adhesive portion and the competitor could pick it up in person or have it mailed to them after the event.

Because the label is essentially disposable, if it's lost, another one can be re-printed. In addition, a central database of logbook entries would be easily created since they are computer printed labels. The stamped imprint would ensure they aren't fake.


I would admit, it might be a little complicated , but maybe it's palatable?
 
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