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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw this on an Indy car in the Chicago's museum of science and industry. The plackard said it was a 1972 Lola with an 800 hp eight cylinder, but didn't specify anything else. Obviously not a rally car, but considering the previous long thread about antilag devices I was wondering if this was one. There is one line coming to it and it was hard to tell from behind the glass if that is a fuel, oil, or hydraulic control line. Any ideas? or other resources?

http://home.mn.rr.com/rally/antilag.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Aren't waste gates on the compressor side not the turbine side of the Turbocharger? The grey pipes coming to it are exhaust headers, you can see the intake pipes just underneath. Also why would a waste gate have a "line" coming to it. Thanks for the input.
 

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No, wastegates are on the turbine side, they are now ususally integrated into the turbine housing itself. Blow off valves are on the intake manifold. Early Indy car turbos were derived from deisel truck systems, hence the big ungainly parts.

I believe this is a schwitzer waste gate on a Ford (later Foyt)2.65 V-8. Vintage 1970-1972.
 

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Waste gates can be on either side. For instance, on a carbureted engine (remember those?) where the turbo compressor inlet was attached to the throttle body, you wouldn't want the waste gate dumping fuel laden air out to atmosphere.
I believe what you see in the picture is a pilot operated waste gate. The large casting on the top is a piston type actuator and the connected line supplies pressure to open the outlet. Some type of boost regulator would control it.
Just a hypothesis...
 
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