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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am just curious about hill climbs, so I thought I would ask about them.

How long are they usualy?
Are they all sealed surface?
What are the entrance fees like?

Basicly if you know a thing or two about them I would like to know and could you fill me in.

Thanks

Otis
 

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I run a few New England hillclimbs with my rally car. I pretty much leave the car alone (I dont strip it from its rally ready setup) but I do switch to shorter firmer springs and a set of Victoracers. The springs are not nearly as firm as the road racers use in my model car but the roads are generally nowhere near as smooth either.

The New England events are 1-3 miles long on paved roads up Vermont mountains, usually 1000-2000 feet elevation increase start to finish and 20-40 turns. The roads here can range from very fresh and smooth if just repaved to rough enough to send my in-car recorder into a tizzy.

There is a lot of info on the events here in New England right here: http://www.hillclimb.org/

Entry fees this year ran around $125 per event. An event is a 2 day weekend thing with 6-8 runs on a weekend. Practice on Saturday is timed but doesnt count unless Sunday is a washout. Your best timed run Sunday is your official time.
 

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RE: Hill Climbs in Pennsylvania

http://www.pahillclimb.org/

About 8 events per year. All tarmac events. Most are approximately 1 to 1.5 miles long. One is 2.25 miles long. All are 2 day events with 1 familiarization run and the remainder all timed runs. Depending on number of entries/crashes/weather you'll get 6 to 12 timed runs per weekend. I've run the rally car a couple of times, just using some type of tarmac tire and sometimes lowering the suspension from my gravel setup. Entry fee is usually ~ $110-$125 per event.
 

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RE: Hill Climbs in Pennsylvania

Colorado hill climbs are all dirt and from 3-6 miles in length. 5-6 events between May and September. Approximately 6 runs over two days. Cars are built to RA rules but restrictors are not required and for safety the club asks that we remove cats, and possibly mufflers if possible. Entry fee of $150. Payout depend on class size but with new payout method we're changing to in 06, for 05 events 1st place paid as much as $500 and all teams got back at least $80. Videos of every event are linked on my webpage below. The other classes are mostly 600-900 horsepower open wheel and stock cars. With the laid back schedule and open spectating and open road between runs we get alot of sweet spectating in over the weekend to. The CHCA website is http://www.chcaracing.com My website is http://www.nocoastmotorsports.net and the vids are in the video link.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
RE: Hill Climbs in Pennsylvania

Thanks for all the info, these events sound like a good place to start "rallying". Are you allowed a codriver or is it required to only have one person in the car?

Otis
 

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RE: Hill Climbs in Pennsylvania

In CO I believe you are required to have someone on the other side of the car. Notes don't have to be read, but there has to be a co-driver. Most teams show up the night before and do a recce, or they use last years notes and take it kind of easy fist run to make any corrections (all of Saturday's runs are practice/qualifying).
 

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RE: Hill Climbs in Pennsylvania

I am not sure if your question is in regards to just Penn hillclimbs or all of them. Your profile indicates you are in Maine so I assume you are also asking about them.

Co-drivers dont exist in the NEHA events. You can take a rider if you want to so long as they have signed the waivers.

There are no notes offered for NEHA events. If you make your own, you could certainly use a rider as a codriver to read them to you.

The NEHA events, like most hillclimbs go way back. Some competitors have run them for over 20 years, and many have every nuance of the road comitted to memory. All the turns have number signs preceeding each turn, erected before events, novices are required to take an instructional tour of the hill at the start of the weekend, the hills can be driven (at the speed limit) almost any time outside the timed events so long as no-one is on the road setting up or taking down things, and there is a "fam" run each morning. So there is opportunity for both notes and memorization outside the timed runs. Outside these events, the roads are usually accessable by any vehicle, though they are all either private or state park toll roads so you may need permission or to pay a couple bucks for access. Of course outsidethe event the signs will not be there so you may or may not be able to determine start, turn numbers and finish depending on your previous experience there.

The course is set up by driver and worker volunteers on Friday afternoon and taken down on Sunday afternoon. This involves stringing a communication wire from the bottom to the top, placing signage and moving equipment for the start, checkpoints and finish as well as sweeping any problem areas. During this time having drivers "reccie" the road is frowned upon, especially since help is needed at these times.

I am still learning the roads (most say they are still learning after 10 years) and I usually make a little sign to put on my instrument cluster with the turn numbers where I need to lift, brake, downshift, etc. and that is only needed for a few of the turns. Thats it - the rest is flat out for me - faster is a matter of finding the lines where I can maintain the greatest momentum by scrubbing off as little as possible either deliberately or as a consequence of turning with big sticky tires.

I can see where having the co-driver and notes early on could help you on a hill, and it certainly would be good for your teamwork. Once you run a hill a few times though you may find the detail notes arent as helpful as the extra weight is harmful (if you are trying to be competitive in class).

I absolutely love doing the NEHA hillclimbs. When I get to where I dont choose to drive stage rallys any longer, assuming I am physically able, I still plan to run these.


Update 1: One of the NEHA regulars and also a rally co-driver contacted me offline andindicated she didnt think co-drivers were allowed at NEHA events, except during Fam runs. I dont see that particular ban in the General Regulations but that doesnt mean it isnt true. I will check on that point.

Update 2: As I could find no co-driver prohibition in the NEHA rules I asked the question to the NEHA newsgroup. I have but a few replies which are from long time racers...they agree with each other. Co-drivers are not allowed even though no written rule has been cited baning them. The half tongue-in-cheek exception was allowing a park ranger along for a ride (since the rangers are key supporters and a lot of the reason we can run these events if one wanted to ride along I am sure the event chair would permit it).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
RE: Hill Climbs in Pennsylvania

That sounds like a lot of fun. Now all I have to do is cage my car and get harnesses. The Rest of the rally gear I guess can wait until have time/afford it... Well now that I think of it my golf will have to wait untill I can afford the time and money to cage it... oh well Hill cilimbs look like a fun and kinda inexpensive way to start racing on real roads.

Thanks for the info

Otis
 

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RE: Hill Climbs in Pennsylvania

>That sounds like a lot of fun. Now all I have to do is cage
>my car and get harnesses. The Rest of the rally gear I guess
>can wait until have time/afford it... Well now that I think of
>it my golf will have to wait untill I can afford the time and
>money to cage it... oh well Hill cilimbs look like a fun and
>kinda inexpensive way to start racing on real roads.

Well, in New England, at least, you don't need a cage to run some of the stock classes...

-jeff
 

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RE: Hill Climbs in Pennsylvania

Since way back when we used to do the NW Hillclimb events, I've thought that a co-scheduled rallysprint, run with an existing hillclimb, would be a very cool deal.

Rather than the best of X runs, score the total like individual stages, with arrival times and the whole deal. Transits would be essentially non-existent of course, and service could be nearby where spectators could see what was going on.

On Saturday, run the hillclimbers all day, have dinner, then run the rally into the night while the party rages in the hillclimb paddock. Run a stage or two DOWN the hill, too if you want some variation.

There would obviously be crossover opportunities, benefiting both series.

K
 
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