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The Scorpion King
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679 Posts
While I am not usually into beating dead horses, I'm bored, so I'll take the bait. I don't think anyone has ever stated that they disagree with the having a bulkhead covering the pump and filter arrangement. It's been in the rulebook for a long time.

Until somebody posts a picture, I will refrain from further comment.

--
John


>From here:
>http://www.rally-america.com/Update/day/day_index.html
>
>
>For those who think fuel system bulkheads are a bad idea....
>
>"Unfortunately the rally has ended early for yesterday’s
>leader Travis Pastrana. ......... The car hit a tree with the
>left rear and pushed the wheel into the fuel cell breaking the
>fitting off the fuel filter."
>
>
 

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I don't think the bulkhead requirement is much of an issue for anyone. The more interesting question is, what type of bulkhead was on the car and where was the cell located? I ask because I am concerned with the the new NASA rule requiring the cell be in the trunk of the car because I feel it is more exposed in a side and rear end impact. We prefer our current location in the rear seat area, directly above the stock location, well surrounded by multiple parts of the safety cage. This is the required location for BTCC and an allowed location for Rally America. Right now we are trying to decide if we should leave it in this location and run an RA logbook or move it so we can run either logbook.

I have no idea where the cell/filter were located in the car in question and if the location played any role in the withdrawl. I am curious however.
 

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Well, seeing as how I was the captain for the finish control of SS#9 on Saturday at 100AW, I saw the results of the crash shortly after they happened.

The car would not have been able to continue regardless, based on the conditions I saw. The team made it through our control, removed the badly damaged tire they had on the vehicle, attempted to point the rear wheels in the correct direction, adjust the location of some remaining jagged sheetmetal, and then installed their spare, which was also flat (I don't know where they may have flattened the spare they had in the boot.)

It was our opinion upon viewing the damage that they would not make it to the next service opportunity given the damage to the vehicle (and we had no information indicating a fuel system issue). As it happened, they made it partly into SS#10 before pulling off and withdrawing.

Brad Odegard
 

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I have a cat.
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The car would have made it to service if it didn't have an inch of fuel swimming around the occupant's feet...despite the bulkhead...and if it wasn't dripping fuel out of the breached trunk onto the exhaust system.

I like my fuel cell well protected by the cage even more after thoroughly inspecting Travis' car post crash.

Edit...also saw the value of the bulkhead firsthand. Without it a fountain of fuel would have been spraying them. Just because it leaked does not mean its a bad thing.

Now, about teaching a driver when to say when...standing fuel on the floor should be a good clue to pull over and turn the pumps off, I would think.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
>The car would have made it to service if it didn't have an
>inch of fuel swimming around the occupant's feet...despite the
>bulkhead...and if it wasn't dripping fuel out of the breached
>trunk onto the exhaust system.
>
>I like my fuel cell well protected by the cage even more after
>thoroughly inspecting Travis' car post crash.


Ooooh...ooooh.... I smell an opportunity to make my case for keeping all fuel system components external to the cockpit and trunk (boot).

Granted common sense would make one (including me) think having a cell located well within the cage is a good thing. However....

I think all fuel system components (tank/cell, filters, pump(s), fittings, and lines) should be external to the cockpit and trunk, because this will significantly reduce the possibility of fuel pooling in these areas. Crashes are not the only situation where fittings can fail. Careless installation, torquing, component fault, etc can cause a fitting to leak. I would rather see leaking fuel dripping onto the ground rather than within the vehicle.

I have seen far too many rally cars (most) with fuel fittings in the trunk that if they leaked would pool fuel in the cockpit and/or passenger compartment.

One might say, "What happens if the fuel system is leaking and the car is overturned?" Well... you might also be hit by a meteor today. Keeping these components outside of the vehicle (sealed properly) might result in fuel pooling on the overturned underside of the vehicle, but not leaking into the passenger compartment.

Okay, boys and girls, flame away at me (pun intended).

Edited for typos.
 
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