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Is that Jimmy at 18:40?
 

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3/14=my 42nd rally anniversary
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Too cool! The movie (which I believe I checked out from the SCCA and showed at a NEOkla Region meeting in the mid-70s) illustrates much of what has been previously discussed in this historic conference. Thanks to a 510 leaping into an Alma mud hole there's a great shot of how well those front mud flaps worked. There are Halda drive cables connected to undriven wheels all over the place. Codrivers who actually had to drive! There is evidence of some trunk-mounted navvie handles. There are precious few roads taken in any of the top gears especially BGDR, a stage I got several passes over in the 80s as sweep one year and in the first rally I did in a FWD car the next year. And even the Boyce/Woods success there - a 24 MINUTE margin thanks to 33 stage wins (how many rallys these days would it take for someone to equal either of those accomplishments?!?). And, of course, more miles and stages in the first 24 hours (628 and 26 respectively) than most most modern rallies offer in an entire event.

And even some things of interest we haven't talked much about, like the Subarus that were rallying even back then. And you have to wonder what the latest group of Belle Isle open wheel racers think of the way the "race track" looked 35 years ago! Anf finally, John Buffum running "A strong sixth." :eek:

I know it was a different world 35 years ago, but those of us who were fortunate enough to experience rallying in that era can't help but cherish the memories. Rallying is such a different animal now ...
 

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just another old phart
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2,258 Posts
Thanks for finding that, it had been a long time since I had seen it. My wife and I made it through 2 and a half nights before the electrics finally gave up and we dnf'ed. Managed to patch it back together to get it to Alma and they let us run the final special stage. Great times.

You have to love the announcer saying at 2:30 AM on Sunday (about two-thirds of the way through the third night) "there's only 265 miles to go"!
 

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Flat over crest
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Historic POR films on DVD

It has been posted before - but that video as well as other historic PORs are available on DVD for the exobitant cost of $10. ($12.50 if mailed within the US).

The films are from 1967, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1988 and 2004. It's a fairly nice slice of the various "stages" of the POR over the years. From the endurance TSD of the late 60s, the early stage rallies of the 70s up to today's return to an endurance TSD.

The quality is rather respectable for the cost.

If intersested in learning more - please contact me off list. (scott[at]teamharco[dot]com) I don't visit here frequently enough to guarantee a quick reply - but that is also an option.
 

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1973 WRC POR
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2,421 Posts
I know it was a different world 35 years ago, but those of us who were fortunate enough to experience rallying in that era can't help but cherish the memories. Rallying is such a different animal now ...
The movie (which I have seen before) is interesting. However, in many ways it does not document what the event was really like.

For ease of filming, the producers seemed to have spent almost all of their time at the start and finish controls of stages. In addition, they spent a lot of time showing the Mickey Mouse stages at the start and finish of the rally that were nothing more than bashing through mud in some fields and rallycross sites.

The heart of the event were the magnificent forest stages in the eastern half of the Upper Peninsula and the incredible sand trail stages in the Lower Peninsula.

Unfortunately, none of these stages are used anymore (although the rally might have used some of the stages now part of Sno*Drift). Jimmy or Joe would know.

As for our 24 minute victory margin Mike, we opted for a steady but fast paced drive on the rally. When someone beat us on a stage, we ignored it. As the rally got closer to the finish, we did not slow down.

It is really hard to explain to people today what a challenge an event like this was. The route was 1700 miles long with 85 special stages (none of them repeated). Servicing was free (and had to be pre-planned by each team) but due to the strungout nature of the route, you might have to do 5 to 10 stages before a service.

Yes, you are correct. Rallying is a much different animal today. But I do enjoy today's sport and I think today's competitors would have a blast if they ever had the opportunity to do an event like the 1973 POR.

BTW, regarding the comments about Buffum's pace. In 1972, he had crashed out of the POR when in a tight battle for first place with Harry Kallstrom in the works Lancia Fulvia. For 1973, his co-driver Wayne Zitkus claimed that he was going to attach a string to Buffum's family jewels which he would pull whenever he sensed things were close to going wrong. :rolleyes:
 

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Unfortunately, none of these stages are used anymore (although the rally might have used some of the stages now part of Sno*Drift). Jimmy or Joe would know.
I would have to haul out my '73 book to be sure, but I believe Fishlab, Avery Lake, Camp 24-25, and East Fish Lake were all used in 1973.
 

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1973 WRC POR
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I would have to haul out my '73 book to be sure, but I believe Fishlab, Avery Lake, Camp 24-25, and East Fish Lake were all used in 1973.
And, as I was approaching Lewiston last year, I noticed signs for the infamous Sterling Truck Trail.
 

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pressing on tirelessly
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However, in many ways it does not document what the event was really like.

For ease of filming, the producers seemed to have spent almost all of their time at the start and finish controls of stages. In addition, they spent a lot of time showing the Mickey Mouse stages at the start and finish of the rally that were nothing more than bashing through mud in some fields and rallycross sites.
Also, it's pretty clear that they only focused on the top teams.

Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme.
 

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just another old phart
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2,258 Posts
I would have to haul out my '73 book to be sure, but I believe Fishlab, Avery Lake, Camp 24-25, and East Fish Lake were all used in 1973.
Fishlab or East Fish Lake: no
Avery Lake was called "SAAB"
then a short one called "Townsend Pit" just west of Avery Lake
then "Camp 24-25"
then west to "Camp 8" on County Road 620
then into Gaylord before returning for "Camp 30"
then up north to "C C C Road" on Canada Creek Hwy
then "Peltz Road" and "Plains Hwy" on the way to the Mac bridge.
 

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Slippy Maybe!?
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The movie (which I have seen before) is interesting. However, in many ways it does not document what the event was really like.

For ease of filming, the producers seemed to have spent almost all of their time at the start and finish controls of stages. In addition, they spent a lot of time showing the Mickey Mouse stages at the start and finish of the rally that were nothing more than bashing through mud in some fields and rallycross sites.

The heart of the event were the magnificent forest stages in the eastern half of the Upper Peninsula and the incredible sand trail stages in the Lower Peninsula.

Unfortunately, none of these stages are used anymore (although the rally might have used some of the stages now part of Sno*Drift). Jimmy or Joe would know.

As for our 24 minute victory margin Mike, we opted for a steady but fast paced drive on the rally. When someone beat us on a stage, we ignored it. As the rally got closer to the finish, we did not slow down.

It is really hard to explain to people today what a challenge an event like this was. The route was 1700 miles long with 85 special stages (none of them repeated). Servicing was free (and had to be pre-planned by each team) but due to the strungout nature of the route, you might have to do 5 to 10 stages before a service.

Yes, you are correct. Rallying is a much different animal today. But I do enjoy today's sport and I think today's competitors would have a blast if they ever had the opportunity to do an event like the 1973 POR.

BTW, regarding the comments about Buffum's pace. In 1972, he had crashed out of the POR when in a tight battle for first place with Harry Kallstrom in the works Lancia Fulvia. For 1973, his co-driver Wayne Zitkus claimed that he was going to attach a string to Buffum's family jewels which he would pull whenever he sensed things were close to going wrong. :rolleyes:
Doug, if ever you get bored you must write a book about your experiences rallying in the 70ies. I really enjoy reading your stories from that era...what an amazing time it must have been! Keep it coming!
It must have been quite the adventure. Sort of like going wilderness camping alone in alaska versus car camping in a provincial park 50 KM from a big city.

P.S Let me know where to send a cheque if there's already a book!
 

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The movie (which I have seen before) is interesting. However, in many ways it does not document what the event was really like.

For ease of filming, the producers seemed to have spent almost all of their time at the start and finish controls of stages. In addition, they spent a lot of time showing the Mickey Mouse stages at the start and finish of the rally that were nothing more than bashing through mud in some fields and rallycross sites.

The heart of the event were the magnificent forest stages in the eastern half of the Upper Peninsula and the incredible sand trail stages in the Lower Peninsula.

Unfortunately, none of these stages are used anymore (although the rally might have used some of the stages now part of Sno*Drift). Jimmy or Joe would know.

As for our 24 minute victory margin Mike, we opted for a steady but fast paced drive on the rally. When someone beat us on a stage, we ignored it. As the rally got closer to the finish, we did not slow down.

It is really hard to explain to people today what a challenge an event like this was. The route was 1700 miles long with 85 special stages (none of them repeated). Servicing was free (and had to be pre-planned by each team) but due to the strungout nature of the route, you might have to do 5 to 10 stages before a service.

Yes, you are correct. Rallying is a much different animal today. But I do enjoy today's sport and I think today's competitors would have a blast if they ever had the opportunity to do an event like the 1973 POR.
yep!
BTW, regarding the comments about Buffum's pace. In 1972, he had crashed out of the POR when in a tight battle for first place with Harry Kallstrom in the works Lancia Fulvia. For 1973, his co-driver Wayne Zitkus claimed that he was going to attach a string to Buffum's family jewels which he would pull whenever he sensed things were close to going wrong. :rolleyes:
"Very Cool"
 

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No!... My left!
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147 Posts
1700 miles... One of the reasons the name fit the event Press on Regardless!

Foghorn, I was at John's Total in Grayling when you came in with the electric gremlins. Remember to gromet all the firewall wire pass throughs, right?
 

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just another old phart
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2,258 Posts
Foghorn, I was at John's Total in Grayling when you came in with the electric gremlins. Remember to gromet all the firewall wire pass throughs, right?
Yeah, LOL, 35 years later it is kind of funny I made such a dumbass mistake in some last minute car prep of deciding to add an ammeter. Given the nature of the stages back then it's probably amazing that it lasted through the 2 and a half nights. I'm pretty sure we were the last dnf of the event. The other major car problem we had was that something went kablooie in the carburetor soon after the start and the car ran rich and fouled plugs for the whole rally. No problem, gave the service crew twenty bucks and had them buy spark plugs. You could buy a lot of spark plugs for $20 in 1973. We changed them at every service. Oh, and Total was providing free gas for competitors too so fuel mileage wasn't an issue.

So how the hell did you manage to remember that grommet issue after all these years?
 

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3/14=my 42nd rally anniversary
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So how the hell did you manage to remember that grommet issue after all these years?
Ya know, when I read his post I was contemplating just what interesting tidbits stick in your head over the decades! Ya'all don't EVEN want to know what's rattling around in mine, but I am comforted to know others suffer the same malady!
 

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No!... My left!
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Maybe it's a sign of age. You were screaming and shouting to anyone who might have an idea what the problem was. I think one of the competitors who was standing there shouted for you to tailgate him though town and down the next stage taking the penalty but still running. Thats when you came to your senses and said that you couldn't do that in case you got seperated.

plugs a problem? maybe you accidentally put Total Powermix in your tank instead of premium.
 

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That is an eye-opening vid. I didn't start following rallying until around 1980, so things were much different already. Is there a way to obtain the full route of the 73 POR? I would love to get a few friends together and drive the entire route.
 

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1973 WRC POR
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2,421 Posts
Is there a way to obtain the full route of the 73 POR? I would love to get a few friends together and drive the entire route.
That is something that I have been considering doing.

Kent - you have the 1973 route book and my pace notes. Interested?
 

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KB-AG in WRC? Awesome!
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Wow! You ARE old Mr. Woods!

:)

Great video. My spine just hurts watching that Wagoneer hop down that hill.
 
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