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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, so this actually came from the post about sizing seats, and someone said that the poster should stop eating so many cookies. Which got me thinking, so I thought I'd post this here and see what thoughts are out there, what other drivers do, etc. I just stepped up to a more powerful car, so I'm looking to make myself step up physical fitness-wise to that level.

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Re: cookies: Actually, you may have a point here.

Rallyists, as a whole, don't tend to be the sort to work out a lot to increase their competitiveness in our sport. I guess I should say "American Rallyists".

Look at the WRC guys: they have fitness trainers, helping to keep them in shape so they can be at the peak of their physical fitness to drive their absolute best.

We tend to not go to such lengths.

I'm not going to tell you my stats , but let's just say that I'm not much bigger than my brother Mark; the driver seat in the Nissan was for him, and I'm finding that after a weekend of driving, the outside of my hips and legs hurt today. I did, however, discover that I never moved in the seat, which helped me to be more "connected" to the car and drive better.

I'm thinking of doing some sort of workout to a) get slimmer so the seat doesn't squeeze me so bad and b) increase my strength and stamina so I can drive better and not be so tired afterwards.

Thoughts?
KT


Kristen Tabor
1995 Geo Metro - Lil' Monster
1991 Nissan Sentra SE-R - Big Monster!!
kd7yct

Vive le Pro le Ralliat!!
 

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For a week before a rally I eat nothing but Trout Cheeks and Turkey Ankles

I have also found that drinking between 15 and 20 red bulls out of a beer bong right before I get in the car helps.

...But seriously I have found that a dramatic change in diet/exercise right before a rally can actually be worse for concentration/stamina needed in a rally.

DDDDDDAVVVE
 

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L3> over crest, drops!
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My "rally diet" consists of switching to light beer, and low fat cookies the week before the race...:7 We cranked out better times than usual too...

BTW, nice drive out there this weekend, keep papa on the gas!:)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Seriously, guys. :) I'm talking about lifting weights, cardio workouts, diet, the whole schmear.

I found yesterday after driving so hard all weekend that I was really sore in my upper back, shoulders and arms. Legs too, to a smaller extent. I was also really tired, but that may have been because we got home so darn late. :)

I like to ride my bike to work at least once a week (and home too, for all you wise-crackers out there), walk the dog in the morning first thing (about 20-30 minutes, briskly because I don't have a choice, he's a big dog), and am working on getting some weights and toning exercises. I just wanted to know if anyone else did anything like this to improve their rally performance, or what.

Mustafa Samli recommended a book called Fit For Motorsports, which I found on Amazon.com for less than $20.00. I gather that the author was a rally driver at some point, and the book focuses on rally driving and fitness in relation to that. So I'm going to check it out, see if it's any good, and I'll give y'all an update on it.

And yeah, keeping Papa on his toes was fun! I liked being able to trade times with other competitors, instead of only being able to beat my old times. :) Now I wanna go faster! :)
 

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pressing on tirelessly
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Well, I'm just a co-driver, but I play hockey three times a week, mountainbike on weekends, and play tennis occasionally. In the few rallies I've been in, I find myself more mentally fatigued at the end than physically tired.

I also run a Miata at the track, and I can tell the difference between when I've been exercising regularly and when I haven't. I get a lot sloppier towards the end of the day when I'm slightly out of shape. My laptimes generally reflect this too.

I won't be driving in rallies until next year, so take this FWIW.
 

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>My "rally diet" consists of switching to light beer, and low
>fat cookies the week before the race...:7 We cranked out
>better times than usual too...

What, no case of Red Bull(sh*t)?!?!?:p

Barrett knows my secret recipe for co-driving goodness...

completely mess up your sleep schedule, fancy coffee, gettin' one (or two, or three, etc.) oh yeah, and food is for wimps!
 

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Hmmmm... I've never thought you had a large caboose, Kristen. Uhhh...I mean...errr... Not that I ever looked or anything.

Oh Jeez. I'll shut up now.:)
 

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On a more serious note.
I sat down with a sports trainer and designed a workout that targets the muscles that I use during a rally.(shoulders,fore arms, calves etc..) I would recommend finding something that works for your body type, because what works for me may not work for you.
For shoulders; while sitting upright with my back supported, I take a 35lb weight and hold it out at arms length with hands at 9 and 3 and turn back and forth so that my right hand is at 12 and left at 6 then left hand is at 12 and right is at 6. Keep doing that until you can't any more.

As for diet, I would stay away from heavy foods and foods that are hard to digest.
Dave
www.endurancerallysport.com
 

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don't cut
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>
>And yeah, keeping Papa on his toes was fun! I liked being
>able to trade times with other competitors, instead of only
>being able to beat my old times. :) Now I wanna go faster!
> :)

And now you know how some of us end up in Evos or WRX's. Sure, rallying anything is fun, but we all wanna go faster. Your turning Kristin, come to the darkside. :)

As far as fitness goes, I drive a 92 ford ranger with a bench seat, manual trans, manual steering, and no A/C. It's hotter than hell in the summer, just like the rally car. The bench seat makes me hang on and really plan ahead for sharp turns. The manual steering builds arm strength, and makes the transition to he heavy evo steering seemless. Trying to shift and turn at the same time is almost impossible, just like the rally car.

Unfortunatly driving my truck is about the extent of my workout, that and hucking rally tires around. I do cut out the beer and heavy foods about a week before the rally, and I do notice that I'm a little sharper, especially as the day wears on. From my aviation experience I've found that for activities like aerobatics (similar to a rally ride) anaerobic exercise is preffered. That's stuff like lifting weights, vs. aerobic exercise which is running or riding a bike. Of course I do neither, which is probably why I'm just as tired after fifteen minutes of loops and rolls as I am after 15 stage miles.

Dennis Martin
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920-432-4845
 
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You should try some trials biking, also.

Many, if not most, of the trails in the midwest, don't offer much for the upper body because of our relative lack of terrain.

I know Custer south of you is fairly smooth; most everything here in Iowa is the same way.

Also try hitting the BMX track if you can.


No way am i giving up those 88 cent fudge cookies from Wal Mart, though. I am drooling just thinking about them :)
 

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"Fit for Motorsports" is a very good book. For my part, when I first got the Evo I had just returned from climbing in the Himalayas and just before that had won the Swedish pairs rowing championship. Felt good. Now, three years of desk job and no time later, I can feel the difference. But it's not where you might expect - I don't get fatigued or feel a loss of control - I feel a loss of aggression. Fitness makes you a tiger. Grrr.

ACP
Flirting with the laws of physics.
 

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OK, I'm but a lowly codriver and/or service crew chief (depending on the weekend) who usually lurks on your list. However, when I got involved in motorsports, driving autocross, Solo I, hillclimbs, and the occasional track day, I quickly realized a little exercise would do me a world of good. I weigh in right around 100 lbs, but I swore I would NEVER EVER be a wimp! I need to be able to huck tires, tear out exhausts, and tote truck radiators around, and it's a helluva lot easier when yer packin' some muscle. I usually only make it to the gym 2-3 times a week, but it helps. If you work out, drink lots of water, and take your vitamins, you can also easily rebound from that case of cheap beer you helped finish off last night, and still make it to parc expose on time ;-)

Kala Rounds
Fling Pu Racing
#452 Mazda RX-3
 

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Actually,... from the medical standpoint!
Diet and exercise for both driver and navigator are pretty simple.
They do have different needs when it comes to diet.
A driver is the more physical of the two.
Therefore a driver should keep track of his carb's.
A navigator on the otherhand needs a high protein level.
Also, some light snacks and lots of water are important while you're in the car (transit).
When it comes to exercise, both need to find a program that combines endurance and stamina (cardio-vasc ).
I do not recommend that the driver or co-driver eat a big breakfast before heading out to the stages.
The driver would be sluggish and the navie will eat it again.
As in most cases, everyone has there own little secrets to how to preform well.
I do suggest though to stay away from the so called energy drinks. Water is better and doesn't have the nasty stuff those drinks do.

Whiplash RallyeSport
 

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I agree with Ray.

Stay away from big breakfasts, whan you hit the stages with a full stomach, not only you will be robbing performance from your system which is concentrating on digesting your breakfast, if you are a codriver, you will also be risking multi coloured windshielditis.

As far as energy drinks are concerned, I have always stayed away from the Gatorade/Powerade and other flavoured and coloured stuff. If you think you will need the electrolytes and minerals try to get some IsoStar. It's a bit difficult to find it in the US, however it is readily available everywhere in Germany. You can also get it in powder form and mix with water (as I am doing) and a big can would last you all season if not more. Do I or did I see any benefits of it ? I really don't know, I have been drinkling IsoStar during rallies for so long and never had a dehydration problem, I never had the urge to experiment with other stuff or make an indepth research.

My 25 Turkish Liras.

Cheers

M.Samli
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Okay, so I just received the book Fit for Motorsports in my mailbox on Saturday, sat down and read it in a couple hours.

It's pretty good, although I had to figure out how to calc my weight and height in kg and m. :) But hey, I like math, so that's fine.

I thought the sections regarding the exercises for drivers was pretty good. Particularly, and this isn't one I've seen before, the "steering wheel" one, where you take a round weight, hold it like a steering wheel in front of you, and basically steer left and right. That one looks like it'd do good things for the forearms, wrists, etc.

I liked the snippets from top drivers and teams regarding diet, exercise, things they do to get "in the mood" so to speak to drive fast, and the visualization and relaxation techniques (visualization of corners, relaxation so that when you save it from a potential off, you can get back into it faster).

The photo quality seemed to be wanting, but hey. I'm not that picky. The section on water vs. energy drinks seems to be heavily biased towards Red Bull, but personally I find that the caffeine low hits me too hard after drinking one of these. I drink water in the car, maybe a gatorade in the middle of the day.

The diet section was cool, basically it told you how to figure out how many calories you need per day to reach your target. RMR, VOX, lots of interesting things.

And then we got to the last section. Basically, what to expect when the sh*t hits the fan. Either for yourself, or another competitor. Since it was written by a European, the emergency procedures are slightly different (SOS board instead of red cross, just minor things like that) but the overall effect was good. Since very few competitors actually think ahead about this sort of thing, it was interesting. Now I know what to expect when "The Big One" occurs. :)

Overall, a good addition to the team. I will be sharing it with my team mates, and suggest that other drivers serious on increasing their driving level look into it. :)

Thanks, everyone! Keep the comments coming!

KT
 

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Kristen,

Read the section about Louise Aitken-Walker's accident when her and Tina ended up in the lake. Louise is about your size and fit as an olyimpian.

I have listened to Tina's version many times and she has told the same exact thing Louise tells in the book. Impressive.

I'm glad you liked the book.

Cheers

M.Samli
 

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I've definently found mountain biking to be beneficial in how I feel inside the car. I also run up and down the stairs at work 15-20 times a day for my aneropbic fix.


The best thing I've found so far?


A good night's sleep the day before the race.
 

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Was it really the good night's sleep or the lack of drunkenness? ;)
 
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