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Discussion Starter #1
Do we know the DeLorme guys?

http://www.delorme.com/

My company is running a team in a 200-mile relay road race (that's running-running, not running as in driving) in New Hampshire next week, and I would like to print out maps of the area, and service/transport routes, etc. I seem to remember seeing some GREAT free maps online at some point... in an MFR thread?

Anybody remember what I'm talking about, have an url (to free hi-res online maps?) or a better idea? I'm looking for maps of similar quality to what one might use to call corners, etc... but we don't have a dime to spend.

Best - Isaac | [email protected]
 

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just another old phart
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Terraserver has aerial photos that can get you in as close as 1 inch equals 100 yards. That oughta be detailed enough for you. You can also click right to the equivalent USGS map from that site.

http://terraserver-usa.com

Also Topozone has USGS maps available on line http://www.topozone.com/

Kent Gardam
 

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I've recently used TerraServer and at least for the area I needed, the maps date back to the late 60's.

Topozone on the other hand is far superior and much more current, 1991-2001. Problem is with Topozone, you can't just right click and copy the maps off the website. You have to select (highlight) the map as well as the frame it's in, then CTRL+C. Then open a new Word document, set it for landscape, and CTRL+V. You'll find that different elements of the page are separated and placed on lower pages, but you can delete them and the map itself always gets placed on the first page. If you want larger maps to print, select a larger paper size like 11 X 14 (if your printer can handle that). The map will fit the sheet you put it on. Not sure how much resolution you lose going bigger, though.

This information is for reference and personal use only. Be careful of copyright issues.

Hope this helps.

[hr]
CP
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OR!!!...You could invest $40 in Street Atlas 2004 and get the real thing, up to date. The entire US of A. For a few bucks more, get the maps in Topo form. I find a use for Street Atlas every day (including a lot of uses I never thought of until I had it). The most useful piece of software you'll ever own, if you do anything involving mapping, travel, rally, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, I've got the atlas back in Boston (along with about six linear feet of assorted regional maps and charts) but unfortunately, I'm in New York and won't be passing through Boston on my way to (northwestern) New Hampshire -- so I'm trying to scrounge something on the web.

Thanks for the good suggestions.

-Isaac
 

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Good luck with the relay....what's it called?

Oregon's famed Hood-to-Coast relay just occurred last week (claims to be the largest in the world with 1,000 twelve-man teams covering 196 miles) www.hoodtocoast.com (cheap thrill: read the team names under RESULTS)

Why the maps, Isaac? We never get lost on the HTC... we just watch for all the other thousand minivans filled with exhausted, smelly, sleep-deprived running junkies.

:7
 

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Discussion Starter #7
>Why the maps, Isaac? We never get lost on the HTC... we just
>watch for all the other thousand minivans filled with
>exhausted, smelly, sleep-deprived running junkies.

When you're running out front, you gotta know where you're going! ;-)

-Isaac
 

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Discussion Starter #8
>Good luck with the relay....what's it called?
>

It's the "Reach The Beach" relay, from Bretton Woods (in the mountains of NH) to Hampton Beach, 200 miles away.

http://www.rtbrelay.com/index.html

Should be a hoot.

If there's anybody in Vermont (along Rte. 91 south of St. Johnsbury?) or east through NH, who might want to loan us a tent or two, drop me a note. We'll trade ya 36 hours of good company (ahem: blisters, pathos, and increasingly-psychotic humor?) in exchange for portable shelter!

Best - Isaac | [email protected]
 

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>When you're running out front, you gotta know where you're
>going! ;-)
>
>-Isaac

Hmmm... I sense a wee bit o' cockiness in that comment
}>

I'll admit, our team took a glacial 28(!) hours to complete our double-century, but we had many newbies (including a guy who'd given up chain smoking just 3 weeks prior & had just picked up running).

Good luck with the roadkills (my tally was 56-0:p )!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
>newbies (including a guy who'd given up chain smoking just
>3 weeks prior & had just picked up running).

Yeah, I'm that guy -- except I haven't even given up chain smoking yet.

If there's anybody from the VT/NH who wants to try to meet up at some point next weekend, I'd love to see any rallyfolk!!

-Isaac
 

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Ditto

I just got 2004. I think it is the 3rd or 4th version I've owned. It is a really good program.

You can get the TopoUSA program for topographic maps, elevation reports, etc.

--Jason Williams
'86 G2 Celica
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just got back to NYC after 72 hours of relay running madness. Reach the Beach is MAYBE EVEN MORE FUN THAN RALLY -- my god, did I just say that.

Partypeople: you have got to try this. Run 200 miles in 24 hours, hot non-stop relay-race action with 2500 people running all day, all night, and all day the next day. From Mount Washington to Hampton Beach, New Hampshire, a la Oregon's famous (~1500 participants!) Hood to Coast relay.

It's like... a rally without any transits. One stage ends and the other starts instantly. Makes life interesting for the support vehicles, and don't even think about sleeping... until you reach the beach!!

Anyway, still high on sweat and blisters. Thanks for the comments and suggestions.

-Isaac

p.s. And, no no: when I said "when you're running out front, you gots to know where you're going..." I wasn't saying we'd be fast. Ohhh no, no no: they start the slowest teams first (like 6 HOURS first) and then the professionally speedy guys catch you up along the way, so everybody finishes pretty much together. We finished next to last in our class (Corporate Mixed Open) with 7 women and 5 men, half of whom hadn't run 10 miles in anger in a looong time. But wow: what a blast.

And don't even get me started talking about the "ultra team" teams, who run two stages back to back, or twice as often. Saturday morning, I fell into cycle with this one guy who was starting his last leg (a mere 7+ miles) after having already run 37 miles in the previous 12 hours. That's some ballsy running, that is: 45 miles in <24 hours? HOLY CRAP!

The award for best team name (JV, you'll like this one...) (and you TOO Morgan -- amazingly, I predict you'll both agree!) has gotta go to the goodfolks of team Weapons of Ass Reduction (WOAR). Imagine yourself croaking at mile 4 of a 9-mile stage, seemingly uphill all the way, and somebody runs by with Weapons of Ass Reduction written on their back. Awesome sight. And then 10 minutes later their chase van toodles past, with a giant fleshy ass glued to the back of the truck. Words cannot do that moment justice.

Reach The Beach realy 2004 -- you know you want to run it!!! I'll be there, 15 years of chain smoking and all.

No sleep 'til Brooklyn!! - Isaac
 
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