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Thread: Getting Started Co-Driving Tips

  1. #21
    into right 2 tightens tcc's Avatar
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    Just use a calculator if you aren't sure on the math. Basic addition is hard.

    I do occasionally ask Chad, but I think I've been doing that less lately. His math skills are also suspect.
    Jay Luikart
    #687 G2 goofy seat

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  3. #22
    drive. I say where we go, ok? EastSideTurku's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcc View Post
    Just use a calculator if you aren't sure on the math. Basic addition is hard.

    I do occasionally ask Chad, but I think I've been doing that less lately. His math skills are also suspect.
    huomattava!!! At least they are trustworthy!
    A. Hakala

    Rallying, leaving my carbon footprint
    all over the States since 2003.

    www.alixhakalaracing.com

  4. #23
    codriveur
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmy View Post
    Different strokes, I guess.

    I have never asked a driver to check my math.

    Seems to me like that is a division of labor (labour). I wouldn't expect him/her to ask me which pedal or gear to use....

    press on,
    ditto

    but I know of a codriver who has reached over and shifted due to driver deafness.
    Bernie

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  6. #24
    'is the engine bogging?' RobBohn's Avatar
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    I like to have the driver double-check the math - the driver can win it, but the navigator can lose it - and if you lose over a simple math error, it's doubly embarrasing!

    I recommend that you write the double-checked number right on the score card, now that R-A allows you to write there - makes it easier to communicate with the workers at the MTC/ATC, especially when in a noisy V8 beastie.
    Rob Bohn

    "If you're in control, you're not driving fast enough." - Parnelli Jones
    "If you're in a control, don't go backwards." - anonymous
    Old Co-Driver's FAQ at RallyCoDrivers.org / slideshow here

  7. #25

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    Always perform 30% more than what your job requires you. Your primary goal is obviously your duties in the right seat: Delivering the pacenotes perfectly and to the driver's likings, keeping the car on time and on route during transit sections, do overall a professional job inside and outside the car (before and after the event too) in that precise order.
    YOUR GOAL for the end of the season has to be to have your driver, your team manager and your sponsors tell you have done a great job, it has been a pleasure working with you for the season and they are looking forward to the next one. If that happens you have done your job 110% and you are climbing the ladder the right way. The racing lifespan of a codriver is usually double the one of a driver and there is plenty of time to learn, but at the same time you must keep your eyes open for opportunities and grab them when they present themselves. Also, luck in the codriving world is less important than for Rally Drivers. If you are very good at it, you WILL make it to the top rides.

    alexgelsomino.com

  8. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by flatOVERcrest View Post
    Always perform 30% more than what your job requires you. Your primary goal is obviously your duties in the right seat: Delivering the pacenotes perfectly and to the driver's likings, keeping the car on time and on route during transit sections, do overall a professional job inside and outside the car (before and after the event too) in that precise order.
    YOUR GOAL for the end of the season has to be to have your driver, your team manager and your sponsors tell you have done a great job, it has been a pleasure working with you for the season and they are looking forward to the next one. If that happens you have done your job 110% and you are climbing the ladder the right way. The racing lifespan of a codriver is usually double the one of a driver and there is plenty of time to learn, but at the same time you must keep your eyes open for opportunities and grab them when they present themselves. Also, luck in the codriving world is less important than for Rally Drivers. If you are very good at it, you WILL make it to the top rides.

    alexgelsomino.com
    That is great advice from a top co-driver...Thanks, Alex!

  9. #27

    Default N American codriving/pacenoting manual

    Hot off the presses!

    I had several people interested in codriving ask me to give them a how-to seminar so I began writing one. Well, the final product turned out to be more of a book (100+ pages). While aimed at novice codrivers, the movement plan example and pacenoting information includes a couple tricks and terms that could benefit experienced teams. Some tidbits useful for drivers to avoid penalties.

    So much for the cut and paste non-formatting of an outline but here is the glossary

    1. Pre-event duties
    A. Familiarize yourself with sanctioning bodyís rulebook
    B. Familiarize yourself with event supplemental rules
    C. Movement plan
    D. Checklist
    E. Car setup
    F. Codriverís bag/Camelback
    G. Dealing w/ motion sickness
    2. During the rally
    A. Registration
    B. Scrutineering/Technical Inspection
    C. Odo check
    D. Parc Expose/Parc Ferme
    E. Controls
    i. Main
    ii. Arrival
    iii. Finish
    iv. Regrouping
    v. Observation
    vi. Quiet zones
    vii. Missing controls
    viii. Quebec
    F. Timing
    i. Stage schedule
    ii. Scorecard
    iii. Reseed/regrouping
    iv. Time penalties
    v. Maximum permitted lateness/earliness
    G. Following route
    i. Routebook
    AA. Routebook Contents
    a. Stage schedule
    b. Glossary of terms and symbols
    c. Emergency contact #s
    d. Maps
    e. Blank inquiry forms
    f. Blank withdrawal notice form
    g. Blank incident report form
    h. Odo check instructions
    i. Blank competitor stage timeís comparison chart
    j. Blank event competitor event evaluation form
    k. OK sign/Red cross
    l. Tulip instructions
    BB. Routebook preparation
    CC. Calling routebook instructions
    a. Routebook instruction vocabulary
    b. Routebook instruction timing
    ii. Stagenotes
    AA. Types of stagenotes
    a. Jemba inertia notes
    b. Human measured notes
    BB. Preparing notes prior to start of rally
    CC. Notes familiarization pass
    DD. Preparing during rally, calling note and getting lost
    iii. Pacenotes
    AA. Recce
    a. Be ready and equipped
    b. 1st pass
    c. 2nd pass
    d. Rewrite vs. edit original
    CC. Preparing notes during a rally
    DD. Calling stagenotes
    EE. If you become lost in stage notes
    H. Service area
    I. Emergency procedures
    i. Use of warning signs
    ii. Reaction to warning signs (and absence of warning signs)
    J. Sweep
    K. Results
    L. Inquires
    M. Competitor event evaluation
    N Thank workers
    3. Appendix
    A. Sources
    B. Movement plan example
    C. Related websites

    Includes for you photocopying pleasure; blank codriver event checklist, blank stage times comparasion chart and blank service checklist.

    Includes 5 examples of pacenotes from well-traveled N American teams with notes describing each style.

    $25 plus shipping. Can deliver to events I'm participating in. PM me here.
    Dave Shindle/Navitron 2000

  10. #28

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    Breaking tons of rules here... I know this topic is dead and this is my first post, but since I co-drive this is the first thread I saw and thought of some simple first time co-driver tips. I've been to 5 rallies and codriven 3 so I am still very much a novice but this is some info that was given to, or would have helped me the first time. These are all assuming that since it's your first time you are at least friends with your driver. Also these aren't going to be as deep and meaningful as some of the other advice, these are just some super novice tips for your first rally.

    1. As a co-driver you are responsible for time. Get a nice digital watch with seconds and set it to the rally clock as soon as possible. You can't place 100% of your trust on this watch (although you kind of have to) but as long as you are consistently checking its sync you will be ok. I bought mine for nine bucks at a K-mart in Blythe. It's pink and polka-dotted but it has a huge display and was still on the exact second when I left desert storm.

    2. On my Route book/pace notes I use these little post it note tabs to mark the 1st page of each stage and transit. I actually put them on the back side of the previous page so I can just pull the book open by the tab and bam I'm on the stage we want. Just makes it easier to get to things quickly. I also dog ear every other page to help avoid skipping pages. It might happen so just be aware that it could and be ready to recognize it when your notes seem wrong.

    3. I might have a slight case of ADD so this may only apply to me, but the biggest thing I remind myself of throughout the race is to FOCUS. I tend to go on autopilot normally so I have to really press myself to pay attention to everything I'm doing. So yeah, FOCUS. And stay FOCUSED.

    4. Bring a ton of pens and keep them handy. I don't know how many I have lost so far.

    5. This one applies more to a team like mine (me a buddy and his parents) but don't be afraid to remind your driver if you guys are running late for anything. 5 minutes in real time will seem much shorter than 5 minutes in I swear I can fix this right now time. Yell if you have to.

    6. Outside of the car, help out as much as you can. Learn the routines of service and fuel and every other kind of down time. Learn how the car gets tied down on the trailer and where all the gear goes. It all seems simple but your driver has most likely spent a metric ton of money so far and it can get stressful when things dont go right.

    As far as having a driver check math... In the 3 Southwest Regionals we have done, the transits so far have all been short (45 minutes was the longest I believe) and simple routes that we already had memorized after recce. So yeah I check my math with him every time and I check it several times after that. When you are on a 45 minute drive that you both have done several times you don't really have anything better to do other than talk about what kind of beer you want later or decide if you are going to check out the pool at the hotel. Keep in mind that we are nowhere near what I would consider proffesionals, just hobbyists that like to have fun, neither of us are getting payed and we are just happy to be racing.

    Good luck, and again, sorry for reviving a dead thread.

  11. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by shoogshoog View Post
    4. Bring a ton of pens and keep them handy. I don't know how many I have lost so far.

    Good luck, and again, sorry for reviving a dead thread.
    Please do NOT use pens. Use only 2mm technical PENCILS (Staedtler Leadholder). Reason is, if the pacenotes get wet, ink will blurr itself and the notes will be unreadable, or even worse a - could become a + an < and so on. Besides, your driver WILL change 50% of the notes between the first and second run on the recce, so you will have to clean a lot of pages with the rubber..

    Also, you never know when you need to "erase your way out of a problem". In Wales 2010, on our way to Cardiff for the very last control (70 or so Ks transit), I accidentally wrote my check in reminder on the time card, where the marshall was supposed to write it, instead that on the Competitor allowance space..That would be a DQ, but I was simply able to erase it no problem.
    I usually start the recce with 4 of those pencils and loose a couple between recce and end of the rally, as they can fly off your hands on jumps landings, bumps, rolls, etc.

  12. #30

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    I was told the exact same thing by Christian Edstrom, use 2mm (they dont break) Staedtler Leadholder. Between you two, I think that qualifies as good advice...

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