Anyone know of good ways to raise money to buy a rally car? - Page 4
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Thread: Anyone know of good ways to raise money to buy a rally car?

  1. #31
    eating dust taking photos KevinG5Hahn's Avatar
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    The trick is to accept that motorsports is not supposed to be easily afforded or something that can be done without substantial resources, and rally is the ultimate embodiment of this idea.

    Once you embrace that, you then need to determine how to best maximize your financial resources and time and then determine what other things that consume those resources and how valuable they are.

    If your under 25, put every ounce of time and energy into getting a great job that pays good money and only allocate rally resources to saving, volunteering at events, and crewing for teams so you can learn the true costs of competition.

    The sweet spot for competing and participating in rally is 25-30/35 and then 45/50+, basically, when you should be able to have a good job/income without necessarily having things like family or house payment to consume your resources (time and or money). Then from 30/35 through mid to late 40s is time to focus on the career, family, house, and what not. Once that is all established, if you are fortunate enough to be able to generate enough resources (again, money, but also time), its time to get back to competing again.

    If your 17 or 18, this isn't what you want to hear, but its the truth. So if your in that age bracket, get a dirt bike or a rallycross beater for your racing fix and work your butt off, either in school or in getting started on a career path (just because people talk about education, doesn't mean everyone needs a bachelors/masters degree to be happy, the world needs electricians and plumbers just as much as it needs an engineer these days, both career paths are capable of generating enough income to compete/have a good life for people that are driven) and if that career path includes education, do everything possible to graduate with as little debt as possible (you can't imagine how much it sucks to make good money but have half of each check going to student loans).

    Once you have the job and the income, then figure out what you can afford and set your competition goals that way, maybe its a year of saving and then a year of competing, maybe its 1 local and 1 tow away race, maybe to make it big and its 5+ events a year.

    But realize this is only ever going to be a hobby for 99.9% of people in the world, maybe you can get lucky enough and someone will someday subsidize some of the cost for you, but probably not, so figure out how to support yourself in the sport, work towards that, then worry about the car.
    Kevin Hahn
    KevinHahnPhotography.com
    "altitude just means not lifting..."

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  3. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by LexusFman View Post
    But enough about the life theories of an 18 year old I'm pretty sure I've put plenty of annoying into this fourm already.
    Not near as much as some people who seem to do it just to be annoying. Hang in there grasshopper.

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinG5Hahn View Post
    The trick is to accept that motorsports is not supposed to be easily afforded or something that can be done without substantial resources, and rally is the ultimate embodiment of this idea.

    Once you embrace that, you then need to determine how to best maximize your financial resources and time and then determine what other things that consume those resources and how valuable they are.

    If your under 25, put every ounce of time and energy into getting a great job that pays good money and only allocate rally resources to saving, volunteering at events, and crewing for teams so you can learn the true costs of competition.

    The sweet spot for competing and participating in rally is 25-30/35 and then 45/50+, basically, when you should be able to have a good job/income without necessarily having things like family or house payment to consume your resources (time and or money). Then from 30/35 through mid to late 40s is time to focus on the career, family, house, and what not. Once that is all established, if you are fortunate enough to be able to generate enough resources (again, money, but also time), its time to get back to competing again.

    If your 17 or 18, this isn't what you want to hear, but its the truth. So if your in that age bracket, get a dirt bike or a rallycross beater for your racing fix and work your butt off, either in school or in getting started on a career path (just because people talk about education, doesn't mean everyone needs a bachelors/masters degree to be happy, the world needs electricians and plumbers just as much as it needs an engineer these days, both career paths are capable of generating enough income to compete/have a good life for people that are driven) and if that career path includes education, do everything possible to graduate with as little debt as possible (you can't imagine how much it sucks to make good money but have half of each check going to student loans).

    Once you have the job and the income, then figure out what you can afford and set your competition goals that way, maybe its a year of saving and then a year of competing, maybe its 1 local and 1 tow away race, maybe to make it big and its 5+ events a year.

    But realize this is only ever going to be a hobby for 99.9% of people in the world, maybe you can get lucky enough and someone will someday subsidize some of the cost for you, but probably not, so figure out how to support yourself in the sport, work towards that, then worry about the car.
    But do you expect kids to just give up?????
    #112 In DiRT 3 at Rally Finland-Tupasentie with S2000 cars. That record is going down

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  6. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by LexusFman View Post
    But do you expect kids to just give up?????
    No, just accept that you won't be able to afford to do it unless your parents are handing you large sums of dollars. You can volunteer, crew for teams, etc - but competing costs a lot. I don't expect an 18 year old to buy a condo in Manhattan either - but that doesn't mean you shouldn't aspire to it.

  7. #35
    eating dust taking photos KevinG5Hahn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LexusFman View Post
    But do you expect kids to just give up?????
    No.

    I expect kids to "grow up" and realize that life is hard, rally is harder, and you need to have a plan more than a want to.

    Figure out what you want in life, then come up with an actual plan to obtain that, and put it into motion.

    I got hooked on the sport when I was 16, but I figured out really quick that it costs real money, and that until I could be in a position to put real money towards it, my participation would not be as a driver.

    If you don't want to wait, figure out a plan, a real plan, and put it into motion, but I think I laid out a pretty decent plan for you, you just don't like the timeline....
    Kevin Hahn
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    "altitude just means not lifting..."

  8. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinG5Hahn View Post
    No.

    I expect kids to "grow up" and realize that life is hard, rally is harder, and you need to have a plan more than a want to.

    Figure out what you want in life, then come up with an actual plan to obtain that, and put it into motion.

    I got hooked on the sport when I was 16, but I figured out really quick that it costs real money, and that until I could be in a position to put real money towards it, my participation would not be as a driver.

    If you don't want to wait, figure out a plan, a real plan, and put it into motion, but I think I laid out a pretty decent plan for you, you just don't like the timeline....
    I don't hate your plan duuude. When I grow up and get a "stable job" and have no other commitments, rally wont be something that needs a plan it will just happen because I will have the resources and I wont have to eat broccoli.

    Rallying at our age now is what requires a plan because we don't just have the resources to do it. I've heard it been said on this fourm that with almost any full time job, you should be able to rally in some fourm and now living on my own, I can look at the expenses I have and I can tell you now it can happen. Now the question is how do I make full time money at my age. And I don't think that's impossible. Moving out of my house taught me pretty much that there are alot of ways to make money if your willing to be creative.

    As I said before ALOT of money has passed through my hands through the last 3 years. The question maybe isn't how to make more maybe its how to keep more.

    I've had a real plan for a while. I'm in the middle of it. I'm not even at step 1. I'm more like at step 3 or 4.

    Tell ya what when I hit the stages I'm driving to Colorado and callin you out. Showdown on the stages how about it.

    And as I say this before I posted I went to my old workplace and guess what I never got my real last paycheck.

    I'm one step closer

    Be scared.

    Be very scared.

    #112 In DiRT 3 at Rally Finland-Tupasentie with S2000 cars. That record is going down

  9. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinG5Hahn View Post
    No.

    I expect kids to "grow up" and realize that life is hard, rally is harder, and you need to have a plan more than a want to.

    Figure out what you want in life, then come up with an actual plan to obtain that, and put it into motion.

    I got hooked on the sport when I was 16, but I figured out really quick that it costs real money, and that until I could be in a position to put real money towards it, my participation would not be as a driver.

    If you don't want to wait, figure out a plan, a real plan, and put it into motion, but I think I laid out a pretty decent plan for you, you just don't like the timeline....
    I don't hate your plan duuude. When I grow up and get a "stable job" and have no other commitments, rally wont be something that needs a plan it will just happen because I will have the resources and I wont have to eat broccoli.

    Rallying at our age now is what requires a plan because we don't just have the resources to do it. I've heard it been said on this fourm that with almost any full time job, you should be able to rally in some fourm and now living on my own, I can look at the expenses I have and I can tell you now it can happen. Now the question is how do I make full time money at my age. And I don't think that's impossible. Moving out of my house taught me pretty much that there are alot of ways to make money if your willing to be creative.

    As I said before ALOT of money has passed through my hands through the last 3 years. The question maybe isn't how to make more maybe its how to keep more.

    I've had a real plan for a while. I'm in the middle of it. I'm not even at step 1. I'm more like at step 3 or 4.

    Tell ya what when I hit the stages I'm driving to Colorado and callin you out. Showdown on the stages how about it.

    And as I say this before I posted I went to my old workplace and guess what I never got my real last paycheck.

    I'm one step closer

    Be scared.

    Be very scared.

    #112 In DiRT 3 at Rally Finland-Tupasentie with S2000 cars. That record is going down

  10. #38

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    This thread has now 100% gone to shit.


    Bottom line, there's no "cheap" way to race unless you happen to have a large sum of money. If you honestly want to get close to racing, but not have a racing budget, get into sim racing. Nobody is going to "make it big" in American rally on hopes and dreams. People need to get realistic, get a good education or find a good skilled trade that will make you lots of money to go REGIONAL racing. Have your fun that way. I was a 17 year old kid with a dream to race cars, I didn't start racing until I was 26. There is no way a high school kid could do anything outside of running their local regional event. I maybe pulled several grand in a summer job, but most of that is what I survived on for room/food in college, I got my school paid for through scholarship (if you're not as lucky then you're stuck with student debts), came home in the summer with double digits in my bank account and fumes in my gas tank to get me to my first day of my summer job. A running cost for a weekend, if you bare bones it, is something like $2000. The math isn't hard.
    Last edited by Billy Elliot; 08-03-2015 at 08:47 PM.
    Billy Elliot Mann
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    1988 VW GTI - Sold!
    1996 Civic - Build thread!
    1992 Civic - Wife's rally car
    Octane Academy Alumni. They found the best driver by having us snowboard and ride ski bikes!

  11. #39
    Head first, balls deep! WorldHazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Elliot View Post
    This thread has now 100% gone to shit.


    Bottom line, there's no "cheap" way to race unless you happen to have a large sum of money. If you honestly want to get close to racing, but not have a racing budget, get into sim racing. Nobody is going to "make it big" in American rally on hopes and dreams. People need to get realistic, get a good education or find a good skilled trade that will make you lots of money to go REGIONAL racing. Have your fun that way. I was a 17 year old kid with a dream to race cars, I didn't start racing until I was 26. There is no way a high school kid could do anything outside of running their local regional event. I maybe pulled several grand in a summer job, but most of that is what I survived on for room/food in college, I got my school paid for through scholarship (if you're not as lucky then you're stuck with student debts), came home in the summer with double digits in my bank account and fumes in my gas tank to get me to my first day of my summer job. A running cost for a weekend, if you bare bones it, is something like $2000. The math isn't hard.
    DVW was competing RA 'national' championship while he was technically in high school. But, his family also has deep pockets and deep connections in motorsports in general. That toterhome though!

    Seriously, LexusDuder, I wanna come to the big apple and buy you a beer! You got this all figured out. Wish I had when I was in school instead of hookin' up w/ Uncle Sam and saving money. What a waste of several years. And on top of that, I even sold the rally truck to go to school afterwards. Now look at me.. I just assist with organizing rallies and volunteer my life away. *les sigh*

    oh, and do sim racing.
    -Jace T.-
    Oregon Rally Group numbskull
    Freelance motorsports illustrator www.jacetuttle.com

  12. #40

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    Again, Dillon's family has money. Shit, his Fiesta is a beast of a machine but if an R2 fiesta costs $70k turnkey, granted his didn't need homoligated parts, but still was a lot better spec'd vehicle.

    But the biggest way to save on rally is having your own tolls and doing a lot of work/fabrication yourself. I built my own car but only paid to have the cage work and skid plate done. But a set of basic tools is $100 from Craftsman, most other things like bearing presses, ball joint kits, spring compressors can all be rented for free from a local auto parts store. Get yourself a good jack that lifts 20"+, get some good 6 ton jack stands to hold your car high off the ground. But a welder that's not a Lowe's/Home Depot/Harbor Freight one, get a GOOD entry level 140 model. A drill press, chop saw, work bench, vise, 20 ton press is always nice but not 100% needed, angle grinder, cordless and corded drill/impact. Get GOOD LIGHTING in your garage.

    The reality with rally tools though. Thing what the service guys have that work on your car, if you just look up pictures of a WRC service guy's tool kit, get all those tools, you can fix just about anything on a car.
    Billy Elliot Mann
    Car #37
    1988 VW GTI - Sold!
    1996 Civic - Build thread!
    1992 Civic - Wife's rally car
    Octane Academy Alumni. They found the best driver by having us snowboard and ride ski bikes!

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