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Thread: Drones - technology warp

  1. #21
    Spectator Wrangler Bruce Beauvais's Avatar
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    SCCA's policy is no drones over race events also. When asked over the rally safety net, I've been told no drones. As a long time volunteer marshall, I've stopped a number of issues including drones. I've also allowed them with the proviso that they not be flown over the stage. That usually then puts them over the crowd which creates a different risk. As a marshall, I tend to not detract from someone else's experience but won't hesitate to do so if the situation requires it.
    The "pilots" I've talked to have told me the they have a low battery warning so that the machine can be brought back to earth before crashing. I do not know if that is a feature of only high end units or common to all. I'd suspect the the bottom end units don't have it. Then how an uneducated person tells high end from low end, I'm not sure. I'd think some feature are obvious- one doesn't want to risk a $250 camera with a $50 drone.
    The problem then becomes why can that guy fly his and I can't fly mine. Check for the FAA registration ? I'd suspect that, much like CB licenses in the 70's and GRMS licenses today, most users haven't done it. I don't even know if the FAA sends back anything acknowledging the registration. Flying from an adjacent property would be covered by FAA policy but a bit by ours. Our paperwork allows us to "control" traffic on the road. I think the right-of-way in Michigan is a minimum of 66 ft from the center of the road. One then has to visualize 132 foot wide corridor in which the drone couldn't be flown. Possible but difficult.
    As the use grows, I guess I can see a time when registered "media" would be able to use them but not the normal public. Drones can provide dramatic images and dramatic images get expanded coverage. Orange vest on someone with a controller? Numbers on the drone that correspond to the vest? I guess I can see that. Until further guidance comes, the blanket ban makes the most sense and is easiest to enforce.
    Bruce Beauvais
    de N8WLF

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  3. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Beauvais View Post
    I don't even know if the FAA sends back anything acknowledging the registration.
    They issue a hard-card license the same as a Private Pilot, with the title "Remote Pilot"



    Also I have a VERY cheep cheep drone and when the battery runs low, it starts descending (you cannot slow it or gain altitude) but you can control which way its moving on its way down.
    Good place to get started: Rally University

  4. #23
    Spectator Wrangler Bruce Beauvais's Avatar
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    I ran into this at SNO*DRIFT 2018. I had a pilot at a spectator area and he showed me his FAA license. I told him of the RA policy towards drones. He, in turn, informed me that we had no authority over a licensed pilot. So the question becomes, is he correct?
    Bruce Beauvais
    de N8WLF

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  6. #24
    100 K right 2
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    Do spectators at RA events have to sign a liability waiver, like the ones that are needed at SCCA events? If so, by signing the waiver to be a spectator, he/she has agreed to abide by the rules of the hosting organization.
    Because Racecar...

    The first rule of Racecar, is that we do not talk about Racecar.

    "Absolutely Not! No. Rally racing is a back alley sport, filled with jackals, headhunters, and thugs." - Pops Racer.

  7. #25

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    No, as a general rule, spectators do not sign a liability release.

    And while a rally may not have authority over an FAA pilot, it does have the right to declare a no-fly zone for spectator safety. Almost every high school does this for athletic events.

  8. #26
    100 oversquare right bentmettle's Avatar
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    Did you see an actual FAA hardcard? I ask only because there is another document, the UAS registration form, that might look official because it says FAA on it, but it doesn't give the holder any rights to do anything.

    Flying over people/crowds is prohibited without a waiver.
    https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/14/107.39
    107.39 Operation over human beings.
    No person may operate a small unmanned aircraft over a human being unless that human being is:
    (a) Directly participating in the operation of the small unmanned aircraft; or
    (b) Located under a covered structure or inside a stationary vehicle that can provide reasonable protection from a falling small unmanned aircraft.

    They also can't fly at night.

    You can report them to the FAA for violation - but it's the kind of thing you'd just as soon let the local police entity report since I'm not sure how you voluntarily get them to cough up ID as a volunteer at an event.

    If they hold an actual license, they should know this is the law, and the moment you tell them you plan to report them for violation, they presumably would judge that it's not worth having their ticket suspended over.

  9. #27
    Spectator Wrangler Bruce Beauvais's Avatar
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    As I remember , it was an actual FAA license.
    Bruce Beauvais
    de N8WLF

  10. #28
    your other left, you idiot
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    Um, what exactly does "flying over a person" mean?
    How would I, as a marshal, identify the operator of the drone (assuming he/she didn't show me his/her ID).
    Getting the tail number of a drone would border on the impossible.
    All this says, is this really a problem worth pursuing?
    just a poor, dumb, Michigan(now Wisconsin) navie
    KC8YHT
    jimmy

  11. #29
    100 oversquare right bentmettle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmy View Post
    Um, what exactly does "flying over a person" mean?
    How would I, as a marshal, identify the operator of the drone (assuming he/she didn't show me his/her ID).
    Getting the tail number of a drone would border on the impossible.
    All this says, is this really a problem worth pursuing?
    right. I'm not sure I'd even give a sh*t as a competitor.

    enforcement is totally up to a LEO. Just like all the other enforcement issues at events.

  12. #30
    Spectator Wrangler Bruce Beauvais's Avatar
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    In most cases, it pretty obvious. They will be holding the control unit, a box with 2 levers and perhaps an antenna. Looks much like a standard RC airplane controller. In the case of my SNO*DRIFT pilot, the backpack to carry it in drew my attention. When he hauled out the controller with the attached viewscreen , we had our conversation. I told what the RA policy was and he voluntarily show the FAA license.
    I might try and ask not to fly as his radio signals might interfere with our emergency radio communications. If he doesn't know where his transmitter operates, it might work. Does my FCC license overcome his FAA license. We all have an obligation not to interfere with other radio services.
    Bruce Beauvais
    de N8WLF

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