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Thread: Question about towing?

  1. #41
    don't cut
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    I once towed a Chevelle to a local dirt track with a carbed Mazda B2000. Doing about 20mph under average traffic a State Patrol stopped me and asked what I was doing. I replied "going racing". He mentioned the race car was bigger than the tow vehicle. He then noticed the truck had dealer plates (I had a dealers license). He commented that dealers license was for cars for sale. I assured him the Mazda was for sale...seriously. It was requested that I not repeat the stunt on the next weekend. I readily complied.

    Any modern V-6 or better full size truck should tow ok or better. The 6's don't get any better economy than a mid sized V8 after about 1998 or so. 1/2 ton Chev with a 5.3 can see low 20s just driving. So they make pretty nice DD rigs. We don't even own an actual car. 2500HD for towing, 5.3 Tahoe for groceries and the Missus has a Trailblazer SS for her garage queen. All 4x's but we don't put a ton of miles on anything so a Prius is something we jaw as we pass them (they usually hog the fast lane at right on or under speed limit). If we run out of oil some day I want to be sure I used my fair share

    Trucks just make the best cars and for a few ralliests they make great rally cars too.

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  3. #42
    NASA Rally Sport grassroots!!! Anders Green's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiTempguy View Post
    Yes, spending $10k on assets is a worthwhile investment ....
    No racing stuff is either an asset (if it was, it would appreciate in value, not the other way around) or a worthwhile investment (if it was, you would advise people outside racing to buy it solely for it's future financial gain).

    It's just stuff you like to use. If you have the money, spend it like you want.

    However, the fact is that 55% of all drivers are only going to be doing three rallies, or less, EVER.

    If you are giving people advice that is based on the premise that someone is going to do 10 rallies, there's a 74% chance that you're giving them advice that doesn't apply to them.

    If you are giving people advice that is based on the premise that someone is going to do 20 rallies, there's a 89% chance that you're giving them advice that doesn't apply to them.

    If you are giving people advice that is based on the premise that someone is going to do 30 rallies, there's a 95.3% chance that you're giving them advice that doesn't apply to them.

    Maybe you didn't know these stats before, but you do now. Giving people advice to spend piles of money on racing infrastructure that has excellent long term utility is, at best, giving the wrong advice to most of them, and at worst, giving the wrong advice to almost all of them.


    The best advice for new racers is to get racing as quickly as possible for as low a total outlay as possible. This sport would be much better served by helping the drivers who only one event EVER (that's 24.8% of all rally drivers) to manage two or three events and for the drivers who are getting to three events to make it to five or six.

    THAT advice would be doubling the participation by half of rally drivers. Imagine if every rally suddenly had 50% more entries. As a community, we've largely been giving people the wrong advice for two decades because we didn't know the participation rates. We assumed that most people need to prep their car with seam welding so it will last 20 events. Now we know those underlying assumptions about long term "rally careers" don't apply to the majority of people.

    Anders
    NASA Rally Sport Director
    Your question is probably answered in Rally University.

  4. #43
    don't cut HiTempguy's Avatar
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    You said $10k, not me. I was just using your number. And no, YOU are incorrect. Any vehicle I've ever purchased has been an asset that has maintained value. I can't help it if others make poor choices in their purchases. I am well aware of your stats Anders, and on the whole while I agree with them, I disagree on your analysis of the final conclusion ( cost drives people off or if they had more money to put towards events they would do more events). Again, you are wrong. But I digress.

    I wouldn't suggest buying a trailer, in fact, I sold mine last year. Storage, maintenance and tires makes it not-feasible. Now, if you use it for other things, it starts to make sense in a hurry. Of course, considering I used it for 3 years and hauled 10's of thousands of kms with it, it by far was better than renting.

    But I would suggest buying a cheap truck. Towing with a car is dumb, there is no need to, the cost-benefit does not work in favour of daily driving a awd Subaru and using it to tow vs a truck. That's why I sold my Honda civic hatchback and daily drive my 1500 crew cab.

    Anywho...

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  6. #44
    R4Vlg>TREE
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    My original plan was actually to go the uHaul or similar trailer route. It is indeed a viable plan, and sure, you don't have to maintain/etc it yourself. Downside? Well, ask James Bass for his total hour count spent stranded on the road with a rental trailer that failed spectacularly until he got his own. I'm pretty sure his (waking) hour count is >24 from them. When we did Perryville and it blew a tire, and the lugs were seized, it was something like 3-5 hours for their assistance to show up to repair it. He said he'd never rent a trailer again - until he did for the Merkur back from NE. That one had a hub fail and burst into flame on the highway that I think was a ~2 day adventure in rental trailer assistance.

    I think maybe a good theme that one can see between the lines here, aside from cost, practicality, etc arguments which are almost personal taste:

    If you have good ties in the community, flexible with your time, etc - go rental. It'll work out and you'll save money.
    If you are more pressed for time and don't have as many connections, consider buying - it may well be worth the cost.

  7. #45
    150 K Right 4 Into Truck Dust BajaBill's Avatar
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    I would still get the rally car first, like Anders said 55% of the racers do 3 or less events ever.

    Bill Holmes
    Ford Raptor #44

  8. #46
    R4Vlg>TREE
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    No question there, that should be a no brainer.

  9. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiTempguy View Post
    Any vehicle I've ever purchased has been an asset that has maintained value. I can't help it if others make poor choices in their purchases. .
    This statement is either false, or you are not counting all of the costs to own your vehicles.

  10. #48
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    I think you guys are just getting into a weird semantics argument over "maintained value" - vehicles rarely drop to 0 or negative value, so they are still an asset, if depreciating. It's not terribly meaningful either way.

  11. #49
    don't cut
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    A truck is an asset and under certain circumstances could be considered an investment. I bought my 2500HD gasser for a great price 3 years ago from an estate. The truck is still worth more today than my original purchase price. It can happen with some careful shopping.

    We all need to remember or at least consider not everyone who visits this forum is broke, destitute and starving. Some people like trucks, need a truck and use trucks. Others build rally cars that never get finished. Hard to carry 20ft lengths of roll cage tubing in a Geo Metro....

    Argue on.

  12. #50
    100 oversquare right
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Average View Post
    Go to a local SCCA / NASA Road Race, check out popular tow vehicles, and ask the owners Pros & Cons. Don't cost nothing, and you may learn somthing.
    Only 1 problem with that. Those regional guys are used to towing 200-400 miles to events. You can make almost anything do for those short distances. On the other hand, we tow 500-1000 mile easily to and back from events on a regular basis.

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