Cross band repeat or dual recieve?
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Cross band repeat or dual recieve?

  1. #1
    R6+ / Cr, Sheeps Maybe KDeV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    S. Ontario
    Posts
    305

    Default Cross band repeat or dual recieve?

    I've finally got the power and antenna wiring in my truck to my FT-2900 but the last rally I worked it was nice out so I was on my ft-60 handy instead and running simplex I could barely get through. Looking at possibly upgrading the mobile rig. I wanted to clarify which is the key feature that I need to get to transmit on my handy and have it boosted through my mobile? Do I understand correctly that dual band repeat will pickup my signal from the handy and send it out on the repeater input frequency and the dual recieve is what I'd need to use APRS or monitor 2 freq. at a rally?
    Last edited by KDeV; 10-05-2013 at 05:19 AM.
    Rallies worked: CARS: Perce-Neige, Shannonville, Lanark, Black Bear, Galway-Cavendish, Tall Pines. RA: Mt. Washington
    ...also known as VA3KDV

  2. Remove Advertisements
    SpecialStage.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Spectator Wrangler Bruce Beauvais's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Greenville, Michigan, US.
    Posts
    829

    Default

    Dual band repeat, commonly known as cross-band repeat, uses the mobile rig to repeat the handheld's signal to the main repeater and vice-versa (V/U and U/V). Dual receive allows one to monitor two frequencies simultaneously. Yes,you've got the basic ideas correct. Dual band repeat might be interpreted to mean the capability to repeat to repeat within the same band. No radio I know of can do that at the same time.
    The thing to watch on dual receive is what the radio can do. Ideally you want the capability of VHF/VHF (V/V). UHF/UHF (U/U) and VHF/UHF (V/U). Most of the newer radios can do that. Earlier ones were often only capable of U/V and V/U. Be aware that monitoring two frequencies at the same time can get confusing. One has to be aware of what voice goes with which function/frequency. I used my Wouxon hand-held at a race to monitor race control and the stewards net at the same time (V/V). While it was interesting to hear the action/reaction between the twp nets, it could get confusing at times. One really had to pay attention and match voice to net.
    Bruce Beauvais
    de N8WLF

  4. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Beauvais View Post
    Be aware that monitoring two frequencies at the same time can get confusing. One has to be aware of what voice goes with which function/frequency. I used my Wouxon hand-held at a race to monitor race control and the stewards net at the same time (V/V). While it was interesting to hear the action/reaction between the twp nets, it could get confusing at times. One really had to pay attention and match voice to net.
    My trick for that is to have one freq at a lower volume than the main one I need to pay attention to. For example, on stage, I'll have Net Control/Mountain Top set to a lower volume than the stage freq - I can still monitor and hear if anything big is happening on Net Control, but my current focus/responsibility gets priority in my ear.
    NW Rally E-Crew / Sweep #995

  5. Remove Advertisements
    SpecialStage.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    50 caution yump DatsunZguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Wellsboro, PA, USA.
    Posts
    570

    Default

    A very late reply, but maybe still useful...

    Another option tied to the dual receive aspect might be to use two speakers - if your future radio can do so. My Kenwood dualie has two speaker outputs and a menu option to toggle between output modes. I often output a main rally frequency on the B-pillar mounted speaker next to the driver's seat (http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/show...&postcount=472), and have another speaker mounted next to the passenger seat with a secondary frequency running. The separated locations and separate volume levels make it easier to sort out all of the radio traffic.

    Going back to the crossbanding, be careful to modify the UHF wattage that your mobile will be transmitting in order to limit overheating, battery drain, etc. You'll often need the high watt output on the VHF side, but sometimes you can drop this as well. Choose your mounting location carefully to provide good airspace/flow, but shy away from dash mounting in most cases due to issues with sunlight to heat conversion - and increased theft potential. Working a crossband situation at NEFR one year, I had to fair distance away from the spectator area that I was helping to man. I was worried about heat buildup in the closed car, but didn't want the windows open too far due to folks coming up that spur road while I was 1/4 mile away. Parked in the shade to minimize heat buildup. Crossbanding is an awesome option to have when doing "rally radio", but be careful to ID/use call-sign to fulfill the "repeaters must ID" tenet of appropriate amateur use. Best wishes.
    Dave Moore - KB3IEC, STPR Comm. Co-Chief, rally worker, '02 WRX Wagon + '03 Forester, "once upon a time" Datsun Z owner - go RWD!, too poor to race ... Blessings to all!
    "Do not vomit on the finish control workers." (his emphasis) From the section on motion sickness in "North American Performance Rally Codriving" by Dave Shindle.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •