Find me a handheld
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: Find me a handheld

  1. #1

    Default Find me a handheld

    Ok, so I finally put my license to work at NEFR, since Brian was nice enough to loan me a radio.

    While I'd prefer to spend much less, I have $150 in my budget.

    I want a handheld at this time.

    It will be used occasionally at rallies to work a ham station. It will also go in my co-drivers bag if I'm in the silly seat. I have no plans for other uses at this time.

    Brian loaned me a yaesu this weekend, but I have no idea what model it was, but seemed to work well for me.....but I sure as hell have no clue what most of the buttons did. It dual received, which was neat, but also a little distracting for a novice.

    Simple is better for me. SIMPLE. Think of me as a driver who got suckered into co-driver spot....i'm not that smart. Hooking it up to a computer for programming is fine by me...rather use a pc keyboard than a bunch of little buttons.
    is the newer yaesu ft-252 or 257 a good solution?

    It would likely be used for North east area events. So that would be NEFR, maybe STPR, ESPR and BRS. It will likely sit in a box 350 days a year.

    Just tell me what to buy. Don't try to explain too much unless you speak slowly and use small words.
    Last edited by sachilles; 07-30-2013 at 08:24 AM.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    SpecialStage.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Straight @ "T" w1jim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Boston western 'burbs
    Posts
    188

    Default

    There are a couple of 2 meter Yaesu radios available for about $120 and then get an MFJ 1/4 wave whip For $25.
    Call Ham Radio Outlet in Salem NH.
    There are some Chinese radios for about $50 but the Yaesu will have a bigger speaker for superior audio.
    JimB
    W1JIM


    Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
    I don't care where you live - it's a long walk home.

  4. #3
    Dramamine is for DramaQueens Morison's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta.
    Posts
    4,813

    Default

    http://www.hamradio.com/detail.cfm?pid=H0-007323

    This radio will give you some level of scalability with your radio set-up eventually. I got a single band 2m handheld when I first started and sold it quickly in favour of one of these.


    Our club also has a half dozen of these for control workers http://www.hamradio.com/detail.cfm?pid=H0-010076
    We limit them to listening only so the stage crews know what's going on.
    Keith Morison
    Morison Communications

  5. Remove Advertisements
    SpecialStage.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4

    Default

    Also, the little quick reference guides (http://www.hamradio.com/detail.cfm?pid=H0-009767 for the FT-60R that Keith linked) are definitely worthwhile for those of us who use the things <10 days a year.

  7. #5
    Straight @ "T" w1jim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Boston western 'burbs
    Posts
    188

    Default

    In my experience the FT-250R or FT-270R would be perfect.
    The FT-60R gives you 2 meter and 440 but not simultaneously which would be useful for crossband repeat which is the only use for 440 in northeast events.
    If you're going to events throughout the country then 440 might be useful.

    Whatever you get also purchase the longer 1/4 wave antenna.
    I'd also recommend a speaker microphone - you can get generic version on ebay for less money.
    I don't care where you live - it's a long walk home.

  8. #6

    Default

    Get the Baofeng uv-5r or the newer uv-b6 (or uv-b5 if you prefer a flashlight to a rotary dial).
    Yes, they are Chinese, yes they are cheap, but they work, and they work well. The speaker is very loud, and the newer uv-b6 has a very good frontend, which will more than easily pick up any signal a Yausu will.
    No they aren't waterproof, no they aren't super slick (some easily dealt with quirks in software) but they are dirt cheap (you could buy 3 of them for your $150 budget) and they work well enough. Also, if you somehow run it over or get it rained on... its cheap so buy two. You can get two uv-b5s for $85 shipped at dealextreme.
    Last edited by garbageman; 07-30-2013 at 08:10 PM.

  9. #7
    Zero Cents!
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Oxford, Penna.
    Posts
    311

    Default

    Since we're on the topic of "cheap" radios, the Wouxun http://www.hamradio.com/detail.cfm?pid=H0-010931 is a pretty good choice as well. I've dropped mine onto solid, polished concrete, run it through the dirt and mud, and lent it to more than one start/finish worker whilst running as a course car. Other than having to lug a computer around to make programming easy, it fills all the bills, has dual band and dual receive. Hard to beat for the price point. It also has enough channels to store all the rally frequencies you'd ever need for the whole country, and is rumored to be able to also work on FRS/GMRS frequencies. The one down side is that scan is a bit slow compared to the more commercial brands.

    As everyone else has said, get a proper antenna. I run a Commet http://www.hamradio.com/detail.cfm?pid=H0-001578

    Also keep in mind that both the Boafeng and the Wouxun's will work with all the Kenwood accessories (think Peltor FMT-120 to HT radio, hand mics, programing cables, etc, etc.).

  10. #8

    Default

    OK
    Summary of the results so far in order of price I've found. All would need(suggested) additional $25 for an antenna.

    Yaesu ft 60r $142.95
    Yaesu ft 250r $126.95
    Wouxun KG-uv3d $119.95
    Yaesu ft 270r $108.95 including a mail in rebate
    Yaesu ft 252 $104.95 my suggestion...but nobody commented as to whether suitable (I have no idea)
    Yaesu ft 257 $98.95 my suggestion...but nobody commented as to whether suitable (I have no idea)
    Baofeng UV-B6 $53.60
    Baofeng uv-5r $45 or 2 for $85

    Given the antenna, that puts the ft60r out of budget unless I find a better price.
    Given my budget with antenna it makes the wouxun the radio with the most features that also is dual band, followed by the baofeng uv-b6. The Baofeng is very cheap, but seems typical of chinese tech. Price makes it appealing....but also makes me nervous.
    How important is dual band for my intended use?
    Yaesu seems to be favored by many, and I certainly saw mostly if not all Yaesu radios at NEFR...but that is my limited experience.

  11. #9
    Dramamine is for DramaQueens Morison's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta.
    Posts
    4,813

    Default

    What I've seen of the Wouxun is that their programming is really REALLY counterintuitive and you'll spend a lot of time with your manual if you have to change anything in the field.

    I'd say push the budget, or hold off the purchase, and get the Yaesu FT-60R
    Dual Band means you will be able to cross-band repeat through a mobile station with more power and a better antenna. While in many cases this would be your own radio you buy later, I do know if situations where we've placed a radio where 2m wouldn't get out of the hole, but they could cross band to the next radio point, effectively using the other operator's radio to get out.
    Low probability of it happening, but having that flexibility is probably worth the extra $16.
    Keith Morison
    Morison Communications

  12. #10

    Default

    Forgive me for my ignorance as I'm new at this....my only prior radio experience was with CB's many moons ago.

    What sort of programming do you have to do in the field? I guess I envisioned you enter a frequency in, and away you go. I assume there must be more to it than that?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •